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EQUIPMENTCRANES more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


Demag launched the CC 2800-2 lattice boom crawler crane at last year’s bauma exhibition.


John Garrison, Terex chairman and ceo, said that the company will remain in the rough-terrain and tower crane sectors: “We will fulfil global demand for rough-terrain cranes from our Crespellano, Italy, facility and for tower cranes from our Fontanafredda, Italy, facility.” The deal followed the sale of


the Demag mobile cranes business unit to Tadano. The USD215 million acquisition was completed during August and expanded the Japan- headquartered group’s lifting equipment line by more than 80models. This includes rough- terrain cranes, all-terrain cranes, lattice and telescopic boom crawler cranes and truck cranes. Of interest to heavy lift


operators, Tadano’s portfolio now includes eight lattice boom crawler crane models with lifting capacities ranging from 400 tonnes to 3,200 tonnes. It also offers all-terrain units with a maximum payload up to 1,200 tonnes.


www.heavyliftpfi.com Tadano is retaining the


Demag name as a standalone brand, and it is being led by Jens Ennen. To foster a deeper level of collaboration between the existing European operation and the Demag facilities, however, Tadano has formed a parent company to function as the link between the German manufacturing hubs.


Responsive structure This parent company will operate with joint functions covering engineering, product management, sales and marketing departments, among others. Tasked with supporting the manufacturing facilities, the company aims to reduce overlap and increase efficiency, enabling the manufacturer to be more responsive to customer needs, said Tadano. By doing this, Tadano hopes


to refine its existing distribution network, while jointly expanding in new markets. Customers will also be able to


purchase desired equipment from a single source. Ennen continued: “We are


learning from each other and working together to build and strengthen our manufacturing experience and knowledge. This will help us decrease machine throughput times and deliver cranes faster to our customers. This effort is key to reaching our goal of becoming the leading global lifting equipment supplier.” Aside from the merger, the


two companies have been busy over the last 12 months, with several new products entering the market. At last year’s bauma exhibition, which took place


Tadano is aiming to refine its existing crane distribution network and expand into new markets.


during April in Munich, Demag launched the CC 2800-2 lattice boom crawler crane and introduced the TCC 160 telescopic crawler crane.


Versatility According to the manufacturer, the new CC 2800-2 is extremely versatile: it can be used for infrastructure projects in road and bridge construction, is capable of erecting wind turbines, and puts in a fine performance in refinery projects, too. In terms of specifications, it has a maximum lifting capacity of 600 tonnes, a maximum load moment of 7,712 tonne-metres, and a main boom length of 102m. The TCC 160, meanwhile, will


be available for customers during 2020 and has a maximum load moment of 590 tonnes-metres. bauma also saw the launch of


two all-terrain cranes from Tadano – the ATF-100-4.1 and ATF-120-5.1. Both have a strong


January/February 2020 133


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