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INDUSTRY FOCUSROAD HAULAGE


Cargo corridors set to cut through red tape


A simplified procedure for obtaining permits to move heavy and oversized loads has been something of a pipe dream for hauliers across the globe. In British Columbia, new project cargo corridors are intended to make that dream a reality.


corridors designed to simplify the permit approval process for non-divisible loads. The establishment of the corridors,


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according to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, is expected to save the trucking industry time and attract more specialised products through British Columbian ports. Pre-approved configurations will be able


to obtain permits without completing the traditional extraordinary load approval process. This applies to commercial vehicles with the following specifications: a


www.heavyliftpfi.com


he Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure in British Columbia and lower mainland ports in the Canadian province have worked together to create project cargo


configuration of between eight and 13-axle super loads; a gross combined vehicle weight up to 125,000 kg (125 tonnes); an overall height up to 4.88 m; an overall width up to 5m; and an overall length up to 50 m. Inter-axle spacing and axle spreads are


controlled for these pre-approved vehicles. Other vehicle combinations will still need to use the extraordinary load approval process,


Pre-approved configurations will be able to obtain permits without completing the traditional extraordinary load approval process.


which can take up to 12 business days. “This is because of the analysis required to ensure the vehicle’s weight and dimensions will not damage infrastructure along the trip route,” explained the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. By having pre-approved vehicle


specifications and routeing in place, trips on these project cargo corridors can get the green light within two business days.


Evaluation The corridors connect Fraser Surrey Docks and Lynnterm East Gate with the Alberta border at Highway 6. The permit process will be evaluated throughout the first year of operation, with the potential for expansion to other highway corridors in the future. Also gaining traction is the high, wide and


heavy (HWH) coalition, which aims to develop a 1,300 mile (2,092 km) transport corridor for energy and infrastructure project cargoes destined for the Pacific Northwest region. The group has grown from eight founding members to include a large number of port authorities, forwarders and hauliers.


January/February 2020 121


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