search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
REGIONAL REPORTMIDDLE EAST GULF


Al Faris recently transported 19 oversized cargoes a distance of 150 km to


support the expansion of a crude oil production facility in Abu Dhabi.


Services is present in the UAE and Iraq, and has partners in locations like Saudi Arabia. “Yes, oil and energy is the main force,” said managing director Peter Mathew. However, he added: “We are busy in the


UAE with Expo 2020 construction-related activities, besides solar power plant projects. “In Iraq, we work with a couple of EPC


contractors for the oil and gas sectors. We are also engaged in Algeria for a project where we move the freight via Tunisia.”


Key markets GAC, meanwhile, is currently active in all Middle East Gulf markets, except for Iran. Currently, the most important markets for the group are in the UAE, Qatar and Bahrain, said Fredrik Nyström, group vice president for the Middle East. “As the largest economy in the region,


Saudi Arabia is also a key market for GAC,” he said. “We are optimistic that Saudi Arabia will lead the way in developments, given the growth in demand for shipping and logistics services that we are seeing from the country.” The Middle East Gulf is a diverse and


exciting region in which to operate at present and GAC is handling many projects for a range of customers, said Nyström. “The energy sector continues to be an


important economic driver, even as we are seeing increased activities from other industries such as sports and events, brought about by the various governments’ diversification efforts. As the Middle East continues to play an important role as a logistics and transhipment hub, GAC has expanded on its warehousing and 3PL logistics offering considerably, in response to increasing demand.” GAC has recently opened a new freight


centre in Dubai to cater for increasing demand from customers for bonded


116 January/February 2020


ambient covered storage. Meanwhile, GAC has observed strong growth in the energy sector, particularly in Ras Laffan, and it has developed its infrastructure and team to support this. Nyström added: “In general, the holistic


‘energy’ market is the dominant force in the Middle East, of which oil and gas is a major constituent part. There is lots of work that goes into the supply chain around these upstream oil projects that GAC supports with. Additionally, GAC has recently assisted infrastructure and general construction projects in the UAE, in particular to support the nation’s growing breakbulk market. This follows the trend that we are seeing more generally of the Gulf region as a gateway for logistics and transhipment to broader area and, ultimately, the rest of the world.” GAC is seeing the effects of Saudi


Arabia’s continued diversification, said Nyström. “Currently, the group’s main focus has been on meeting demand from the country’s growing events sector. Events logistics takes rigorous planning and execution, particularly in moving what can quite often be expensive or large pieces of equipment. Achieving this multimodally is always an extra challenge, but the growth of this market in Saudi Arabia continues to be an important part of our business in the region. We leverage our well-established


The UAE is targeting a greener future and there has been an increased trend of investment in the renewables project sector, with particular focus on solar projects. – Kieve Pinto, Al Faris


resources and experience to deliver time-critical integrated solutions for this highly specialised field.” Al Faris, the Dubai-based crane and


heavy equipment rental specialist, reported a steady rise in heavy lift opportunities in the region. As well as its Dubai head office, it has corporate offices in the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. “The UAE and Saudi Arabia are definitely our important regions where we focus the most,” said executive director Kieve Pinto. “We recently executed a project for a wind farm in Jordan. There is a focus on the renewable energy sector in the next few months.” Al Faris has continued to invest and grow


its fleet and capabilities and is therefore able to tap into the rise in opportunities, said Pinto. “The UAE is targeting a greener future and there has been an increased trend of investment in the renewable energy project sector, with particular focus on solar projects. Apart from the country’s constant investment in the utility and infrastructure sectors, there is renewed investment in the oil and gas sector in Abu Dhabi and the Northern Emirates.”


Metro extension By 2020, Al Faris will have completed the transportation of about 250 rail wagons for the Dubai Metro extension project. It is also working on a few renewable projects in the UAE, including a solar energy plant. “There have also been heavy lift opportunities within the infrastructure sector for bridges and pedestrian walkways, and there has been rapid development and record construction of entertainment projects in the run-up to Expo 2020. “Dubai continues to invest heavily and


develop some of the most exciting projects seen, in line with Sheikh Mohammad’s vision


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146