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INDUSTRYINSIGHT


Jan De Nul studied very carefully the environmental impact and


the solutions to minimise that impact. This is a good example of how we deal with sustainable financing and actively contribute to [overcoming] the environmental challenges.” Voltaire will be delivered in


July 2021, with Les Alizés joining Jan De Nul in 2022. Also capitalising on green


financing is United European Car Carriers (UECC), which secured a package for three of its newbuild pure car truck carriers


(PCTC) on order with China Ship Building Trading and Jiangnan Shipyard Group. The financing from Svenska SkeppsHypotek amounts to approximately USD70 million. According to UECC, the financing model makes the company eligible for reductions in borrowing costs.


entirety to finance green projects. In the case of Jan De Nul, the


ship designs incorporate emissions reduction technology, while the vessels themselves will be used to support renewable energy projects, namely the construction of offshore wind farms. This ensured that these investments were eligible for a green loan. Luc Popelier, ceo of the


international markets division at KBC Group, explained: “We built on our existing knowledge and experience with green bonds to structure and coordinate this green syndicated loan. Among other things, KBC was also responsible for the elaboration of the Green Financing Framework, which describes the criteria that these sustainable vessels have to meet in order to be eligible for the green loan. “During the design phase,


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Battery-hybrid power The vessels will be equipped with battery-hybrid LNG propulsion systems and will be delivered in 2021. With an overall length of 169 m and a width of 28 m, the ships will have ten cargo decks, two of which will be hoistable. As a result, the vessels will be able to accommodate high and heavy, as well as breakbulk cargoes. With environmental


considerations at the forefront of


We ran the system for two years without a single incident and obtained results that matched the promised numbers. – Jakob Christiansen, SAL


the sector, during December 2019 SAL Heavy Lift said that it had become the first shipping company in the world to introduce hydrogen/methanol emission reduction technology


to its fleet. The heavy lift carrier said the


FS MARINE+ system, developed in partnership with Fuelsave, significantly reduces carbon dioxide (CO2


), sulphur oxide


(SOx), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and other particulate emissions. This is done by injecting a mix of hydrogen, oxygen, water and methanol into selected parts of the air intake of both the main engine and the auxiliary engines. This, according to SAL,


ensures a much cleaner and thorough combustion process, resulting in reduced primary fuel consumption while lowering emissions and air pollution. The FS MARINE+ generator has


been proven to reduce CO2 emissions by 10 percent, SOx by


SAL has tested a prototype of its FS


MARINE+ system on its ship Annette for more than two years, with convincing results.


15percent, NOx by 30-80percent, and particulate emissions by 40percent. The system is compatible with MDO, MGO, HFO and LSFO, as well as LNG fuels. After more than four years of


close cooperation, testing and development by SAL and Fuelsave, alongside project stakeholders EcoTune Marine, classification society DNV GL, Carl Baguhn, MAN Energy Solutions, M.A.C. System Solutions, AVL and the flag state administration of Germany, the FS MARINE+ solution is entering the next stage of validation, after which it will be installed on board SAL Heavy Lift ships.


Innovation frontrunner Sebastian Westphal, chief technical officer, SAL Heavy Lift, said: “SAL has always been a frontrunner when it comes to innovation and we are dedicated to making shipping more efficient and cleaner by using technologies that create a long-lasting effect. “We have tested a prototype


on a generator engine of our ship Annette for more than two years with very convincing results. The FS MARINE+ system not only achieved significant


fuel savings, but also emission and air pollution reductions that were verified by third parties, both during field trials and in laboratory tests.” Jakob Christiansen, naval


architect and head of SAL’s fleet development team, said that millions of dollars have been invested in order to bring this system to market, but the cost and environmental benefits are substantial. “We ran the system for two


years without a single incident and obtained results that matched the promised numbers. So, we see a technology that meets our green ambitions while also reducing the technical operating costs of the ships.” SAL’s heavy lift ship Trina will


be retrofitted with the FS MARINE+ system in the first quarter of 2020, with five further ships to follow.


January/February 2020


more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


HLPFI 113


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