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COUNTRY REPORTSWITZERLAND


many logisticians agree that it will be some time before a wind farm is built domestically. Unless action is taken in the near future,


Switzerland will find itself facing a power crisis – a situation exacerbated by the country’s decision to phase-out its five- strong nuclear power plant fleet. The first has already been taken offline.


BKW shut down its Mühleberg plant in canton Bern on December 20, 2019. There is no definitive timeframe for the remaining units to be shuttered. Equally, there is no firm plan in place as to how 37 percent of the country’s power output will be replaced, or where it will be sourced from.


Permitting problems TGP’s Roehl also acknowledged permitting problems for renewable energy projects, although he delivered an optimistic view of prospects. “There is great potential for renewable


energy solutions throughout the country, and wind power shows particularly great promise. At the moment, there are legal proceedings pending in practically every location new wind turbines could be built in Switzerland, but once this knot is untied, many different wind power projects could be realised. “We expect a growing number of


renewable energy projects to take place in Switzerland over the next few years, opening up interesting new opportunities for the project logistics sector. “ Having entered a new decade, it is


natural to consider how the project logistics sector, and the industries that rely on its services, will change in the years ahead. “Right now”, said Roehl “we are facing


tough market conditions and low freight levels.” He drew attention to constant overtonnage in the multipurpose shipping sector. While these ships remain in the hands of the banks, a wave of urgently needed scrapping is unlikely and the supply- demand balance will continue to be skewed. “Struggling shipping lines are also a concern as we have all seen recently with


Zeamarine. However, we remain positive about the future and are always working to find new sources of growth for our business,” he added. Zaugg at General Transport said


digitalisation and sustainable transport solutions are playing an increasing role in the customer’s decision-making process. Reisdorf added that despite the spread of technology, project freight forwarding remains a “people business”. He also mused over the green revolution,


noting that Fracht has been actively finding ways to reduce its environmental footprint. Developing CO2


calculators for freight and


We expect a growing number of renewable energy projects to take place in Switzerland over the next few years, opening up interesting new opportunities... – Joerg Roehl, Trans Global Projects Group


Upbeat Schneider enters the fray


Reto Jöhr, projects at freight forwarder Schneider, said: “We are handling a lot projects for new customers. Business is exploding... there is a lot of business here in Switzerland.” The company’s recently established projects


division has been successful in attracting new customers. It is in the process of shipping a compressor from Switzerland to Shanghai. The unit will be moved in two parts (335 tonnes and 285 tonnes). The cargoes


110 January/February 2020


will be barged to Antwerp before being loaded onto a part-chartered ship headed for China. Schneider also coordinated the delivery of a


71-tonne piece of railway construction equipment from Switzerland to Asia, via Zeebrugge. It handled a series of transformer shipments,


including three 80-tonne units measuring 4 m in height to Kentucky, USA. It also shipped two transformers, weighing 140 tonnes and 180 tonnes


compensating for that output with certificates was followed by the installation of solar panels at its premises, plus ISO140001 certification in some countries. Fracht is also reducing the number of transport of documents and bills of lading it prints and transports, using blockchain technology whenever possible.


‘Blue’ economy He also drew attention to the concept of the ‘blue’ economy – the colour signifying the importance of technology to realising environmental and ecological targets. “The blue economy is a new idea of


progress, which is about realising a better quality of life for everyone through the search for more intelligent solutions for the use of resources,” said Reisdorf. He suggested that, in general, people are


not in a position to make sweeping changes to their lifestyles to realise climate goals. “We need to be more ecological using better technologies. If we try to cut everything all at once, we will not reach our goals.”


HLPFI


respectively – all on behalf of Swiss customers. Ardian Dervisi, projects at Schneider said that the


company’ success in 2019 was borne out of hard work and delivering high service levels to clients. Schneider hopes to increase the number of staff on


its projects team, but identifying and recruiting talent is as difficult in Switzerland as it is in many other markets. “There is no school for project logistics,” said Jöhr.


“It is hard to find qualified people that do what we do. You need to have a good background in the industry and you must understand the details.”


www.heavyliftpfi.com


In October 2019, Switzerland-


headquartered Emil Egger utilised its 1,000-tonne capacity LR 11000 crawler crane for a bridge hoist project near Lausanne.


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