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COUNTRY REPORTSWITZERLAND


Re-engineering


a logistics heartland


Switzerland is home to some of the world’s most prominent logistics companies but the landscape is changing following Panalpina’s amalgamation with DSV. While there are still some heavy cargoes originating in Switzerland, domestic logisticians continue to focus their attention overseas, using their expertise to generate value for their customers. David Kershawreports.


logistics sector will take time to manifest, as the entire integration process is expected to take two to three years to complete. Still, at the end of 2019, Jens Bjørn Andersen, ceo of DSV Panalpina, said that, so far, the integration process has revealed “substantial duplications of corporate functions” and considerable overlaps in terms of IT systems. As a result, the company is considering several restructuring measures, including the relocation of some positions to DSV’s corporate headquarters in Denmark. It has become apparent that a number of


A 108 January/February 2020


major talking point on the logistics market has been the acquisition of Swiss freight forwarding giant Panalpina by Denmark’s DSV – a deal that closed in August last year.


The effects of this deal on the Swiss


Panalpina staff employed in corporate functions have already moved on to pastures new. A source close to the matter suggested that more information on the merger, which has resulted in a 60,000-strong workforce spanning 90 countries, would be announced in the second quarter of 2020.


Specialised companies Although it remains home to decision- makers controlling cargo flows, the vast majority of Switzerland’s heavy manufacturing industry has relocated to lower cost markets. Nevertheless, it does maintain a handful of highly specialised EPCs and OEMs – General Electric (GE) and ABB among the most prominent. The ‘Made in Switzerland’ handle still carries a huge amount of prestige.


As a result, Swiss logisticians have long-


since adopted a globalised approach to business. So what industries and sectors offer the best prospects for the country’s freight forwarders? “This is a tricky question because every


Swiss forwarder’s services and customer base is unique,” said Joerg Roehl, Trans Global Projects Group (TGP) ceo Europe. “Looking at the Swiss market, we see that power and infrastructure companies and manufacturers are still very active, thanks to excellent Swiss manufacturing and project management qualities. “As a Swiss forwarder, our company


offers its expertise and global network to match the specific and demanding requirements of many of these clients,” Roehl said.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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