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INDUSTRYINSIGHT more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com In the coming years Roll


Group said that it intends to further expand its fleet and heavy lift equipment, as well as strengthen its organisation through carefully selected partnerships in order to handle larger scale projects. Also expanding its fleet this


An artist’s impression of how BigRoll Biscay will look.


Carriers add capacity in preparation for upturn


The multipurpose/heavy lift market has endured a decade-long downturn, but with the renewable energy sector keeping carriers busy and the oil and gas sector showing signs of life, shipping lines are adding capacity in preparation for the improving outlook.


T


he outlook for multipurpose shipping, comprising both breakbulk


and heavy lift vessels, is brightening despite rising geopolitical risks and economic uncertainty. The market and its drivers have shifted, according to maritime consultancy Drewry, causing the analyst to revise its outlook upwards. Drewry expects average


vessel time charter rates to rise 6 percent in 2020, on the back of


stronger demand across the entire dry cargo sector. Increases will vary by vessel size, with those below 15,000 dwt attaining marginal improvements while larger ships are expected to achieve gains approaching double-digit percentage increases. Looking further ahead earnings are expected to continue recovering, albeit modestly and subject to some minor correction in 2021. “Expectations for steel production and trade are


www.heavyliftpfi.com


positive and, although investment in traditional projects remains weak, the momentum behind renewable energy appears unstoppable,” added Drewry.


Brighter outlook This is an encouraging sign for heavy lift carriers and while newbuilding orders remain thin on the ground, some players are adding secondhand tonnage to prepare for this brighter outlook. Roll Group has added a


12,285 dwt module carrier to its fleet. Measuring 146 m in length, and with a width of 32 m, the ship is slightly smaller than the current module carriers on Roll Group’s roster – BigRoll Bering and BigRoll Beaufort. The 2015- built ship will soon be painted in the company’s livery and renamed BigRoll Biscay. Commenting on the fleet


addition, Adriaan Aarts, Roll Group ceo, said: “We are convinced this is a good investment considering the


improving outlook for the years ahead. We expect many developments in the near future and have identified a need for additional tonnage to serve our clients in the oil and gas and offshore wind markets. “Our current module carriers


are perfectly suited to serve these markets but, given the large scale of some of the upcoming projects, further expansion of our fleet is necessary. The acquisition of the BigRoll Biscay is the next step in the development strategy.” The cargo deck of BigRoll


Biscay measures 123.8 m x 32.2m and has a deck load capacity of 20 tonnes per sq m.


We are convinced this is a good investment considering the improving outlook for the years ahead. – Adriaan Aarts, Roll Group


year is SAL Heavy Lift, which will add three 19,100 dwt ships to its roster during the first quarter of 2020. The P1-type ships are reliable workhorses and will be deployed on the carrier’s main trade lanes between Europe and the Far East, and on SAL Heavy Lift’s Africa service.


Heavy lift capacity Hanna (built 2011), Klara (built 2012) and Lisa (built 2011) are all geared with two 400-tonne capacity cranes that can work in tandem to handle 800-tonne loads, plus an additional 120-tonne lifting capacity crane. “The vessels also have very


high crane pedestals that provide a much greater lifting height, in fact among the best in our fleet,” said Karsten Behrens, director, SAL Engineering. “In combination with the strong hydraulic hatch covers and large box-shaped holds with multiple tweendeck configurations, it gives us an array of options when taking breakbulk cargo on board.” He added that the Type 171


vessels come equipped with ice- class E3 classification, equivalent to Finnish/Swedish 1A. They can operate in Arctic areas and the carrier will offer services via the Northeast Passage when suitable. Dr Martin Harren, ceo at SAL


Heavy Lift, commented: “I am very happy that we have been able to add these vessels to our fleet. This way SAL will be able to serve clients who may at times look for ships that can take larger volumes of cargo in combination with heavy lift items.” He added: “With SAL


Engineering providing the engineering solutions and our SAL crew manning the vessels, we continue to offer our well-known SAL quality and know-how, but on a larger scale.” HLPFI


January/February 2020 107


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