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PROJECTFOCUS


more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


The cradling system design had to


allow the loading and unloading of the monopiles via SPMTs.


Onboard system on the deck carrier Zhi Xian Zhi Xing for the project. The system forecasts seaway-induced vessel motions and accelerations, while monitoring compliance with the maximum permitted limits. Octopus-Onboard also suggests alternative routes to optimise vessel performance. Furthermore, the motion sensors tracked the loads during the voyage to ensure full traceability for the client. “Octopus was used to keep


within the predefined weather restrictions during the voyage,” Leonhardt explained. “I was also onboard for the whole voyage to ensure that these limits were adhered to and the Octopus-


Onboard system was operated properly.” The second deck carrier used,


Sun Shine, was also equipped with the Octopus-Onboard system. “Another advantage of the system is that it enabled our client Jan De Nul Group and its marine warranty surveyor to closely monitor the situation onboard the vessels in real time, 24/7,” said Leonhardt.


Innovation To complete this shipment, UWL and UES had to think outside the box and develop a viable way of safely stowing each monopile. The two companies engineered and fabricated a bespoke cradling system that reduced most of the forces experienced during the ocean transport, while allowing the monopiles to be loaded and unloaded using SPMTs. Rolner added that pulling off a project of this complexity was


a great achievement. “We wanted to prove ourselves in the industry – I think we have done that. We received a letter of recommendation from our client, Jan De Nul Group. It was a very well-executed project.” The lessons learnt from the


Formosa 1 shipment have stood UWL in good stead for future projects of this nature. Rolner said: “We have already


secured our next project in the Taiwanese market. UWL will use two deck carriers to transport jacket structures, alongside the installation vessel.” Rolner added: “It is always the


engineering that needs to be one step ahead and challenge


We wanted to prove ourselves in the industry – I think we have done that. – Andreas Rolner, UWL


Jiangsu Zhenjiang Shipyard launched United Wind Logistics’ (UWL) specialised deck carrier at its shipyard in China during December. The 10,000 dwt ship has a total length of 148.5 m


and is equipped with an electric propulsion system. Named Boldwind, the vessel will be used to transport


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offshore wind energy components and heavy modules. UWL operates a fleet of chartered tonnage,


including deck carriers. Earlier this year, the company confirmed that it had initiated a newbuilding programme at Jiangsu Zhenjiang Shipyard, China, for up to four deck carriers.


the current ways of doing things.” Looking ahead, he noted that


an increasing number of oil and gas companies are entering the wind energy industry.


Transport costs “Our feeling is that, on many occasions, the transport aspects of such structures and the related costs are not carefully considered. Due to the increasing distances between loading and discharging ports, those costs become relevant in the overall project budget. “Therefore, more and more


clients work with the transport companies at an earlier stage to


include their input in the design. We are happy to assist our customers with this challenge and are confident that the knowledge we have gained gives us an advantage compared with our competitors,” said Rolner. HLPFI


UWL deck carrier launched in Zhenjiang This is the first of two vessels that have been


ordered. The ships are scheduled for delivery in 2020. The United Group comprises United Heavy Lift


(UHL), UWL and United Engineering Solutions (UES). The group’s fleet now includes 23 vessels, comprising 16 multipurpose ships and seven deck carriers.


January/February 2020 105


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