search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INDUSTRY REVIEWUPSTREAM OIL & GAS


Geodis moves plant for an oil and gas project.


Developing on a smaller scale


Potential mega projects in the upstream oil and gas sector are increasingly being segmented into smaller developments, creating a greater need for specialist logistics services, reports Phil Hastings.


with faster execution schedules, creating new challenges for logistics providers. Paolo Barbieri, operations director for


S


UK-based 4D Supply Chain Consulting, summarised: “Although there are some exceptions, the general trend is to move away from having a few major [over USD5 billion] initiatives towards splitting investment into multiple smaller projects,” he said.


Building pressure “That shift to fast-tracked smaller projects, with delivery schedules over shorter periods and tighter budgets, is in turn putting the spotlight on the supply chain as a key segment to mitigate the various risks.” Bart Bevacqua, US director of sales and


business development for LV Shipping (USA), backed up that assessment. “We are


www.heavyliftpfi.com


ome of the upstream oil and gas industry’s investment focus over the last five years has switched away from very large capital-intensive projects to smaller developments


definitely seeing energy companies and their EPC contractors now being more cautious, breaking down their large projects into stages or phases so they are better placed to react more quickly to changing market conditions. “From a logistics service provider’s


perspective, that means you also have to be able to respond quickly to new or changing customer requirements and be nimble.” Alongside those trends, Bevacqua


suggested there have been significant changes over the last few years in the way oil and gas companies and their EPCs manage project logistics operations. “Whereas in the past they may have relied


on a large logistics provider to handle the entire scope of a project, now they are looking to work directly with individual specialist service companies, for example when it comes to rigging or inland transport. That is where you see the 3PL or 4PL format coming into play in places,” he said.


Although there are some exceptions, the general trend is to move away from having a few major initiatives towards splitting investment into multiple smaller projects. – Paolo Barbieri,


4D Supply Chain Consulting


Segmented developments George Abreu, senior vice president – oil and gas for Geodis Industrial Projects, agreed that many potential mega projects in the upstream oil and gas sector are now being segmented into smaller developments and/or phased in. “That gives the oil and gas companies


more flexibility than if they commit to a mega project all in one go. Coupled with that is often a tighter timeframe for those projects to be executed,” he stated. “From a logistics provider’s perspective,


that creates a requirement for us to be more agile. We have to be able to handle multiple jobs at different locations but still be able to meet all of the client’s requirements at all levels.”


January/February 2020 99


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146