search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
BY SARA WILDBERGER S


enior living depends on a bal- ance of elements: Care, homi- ness, and community. COVID-19 tipped that balance—rightfully so—toward care. Safety, in- fection prevention and control, and health monitoring—not to mention personal pro- tective equipment, temperature scans, and even more continuous cleaning than be- fore—sometimes gave residences a clinical feel. But community leaders did their care- ful and creative best to keep things feeling like home. Sophisticated and basic safety measures alike became integrated into daily life and routines as caregivers and directors strived to overcome what could be some dark days. The definition of safety expanded as it became clear that a good conversation could be just as vital to health as good food and a temperature screening. COVID-19 also revealed how connected we are—and how much all our safety depends on what each one of us does.


This issue looks at some of these changes


and advances in safety practices, some les- sons learned and some remembered, as senior living continues to advance toward a safer and healthier future for residents and caregivers—and their loved ones.


CHALLENGES & SOLUTIONS


ƒ Indoor air quality gains new importance when a virus can travel on a breath. But both new habits and new technology can help make air cleaner than ever: p.10


ƒ Communities are using negative-pressure rooms to help in infection prevention and control: p.12


ƒ COVID-19 has changed some basic design approaches to safety in communities: p.14


ƒ Do indoor plants really help clean the air? The research on the true benefits of growing things: p.15


ƒ Showing prospective residents and workers that your community is a safe place to live and work has become a top issue. Here are some ways to gain trust and give assurance: p.16


ƒ Entry to communities was one of the first things to change with the virus. A look at emerging best practices: p.20


ƒ Coping with swallowing difficulties and disorders when dining and routines are disrupted: p.22


MARCH/APRIL 2021 ARGENTUM.ORG 9


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44