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DESTINATIONS Australia


“Our goal is to give passengers time back – if we give time back and put them more in control of their experience, then you start to destress the whole experience.” While a recent OAG On Time Punctuality


report found Australia and Melbourne falling behind, Gandy is keen to rectify the issue as soon as possible and is already addressing it to ensure punctuality is the best it can be. “We have to play the leading role over what we are in control of then the collaborative role with partners to say, ‘how can we do things differently to make it easier for you to land and take off on time?’.” Adelaide Airport, this year’s hosts of


Routes World in September, is looking to capitalise on its strong tourism growth, new airline partners and underserved routes to drive its growth for the next decade.


Open to new partnerships While Brisbane and Melbourne are looking to double capacity, Adelaide is attracting more airlines to deliver international visitors on direct flights. In 2017/18, the airport grew


international passengers by 6% to top the one million per year milestone, with the biggest increase coming from China. Executive general manager


corporate and finance Brenton Cox says: “We are extremely underserviced, which is partly why we’ve had good growth recently. “Around 40% of customers have to fly via another Australian port to get here, so there are significant unserved and underserved markets, including India, Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines and Japan. “There are passenger movements each year of around 170,000 people travelling between Adelaide and the US, and they are having to go indirectly for at least one stop and often more,” Cox explains. “We have significant excess runway capacity that is going to service us for decades to come, and our project at the moment is providing additional international passenger processing facilities,” he adds. Adelaide, like Sydney, has a 11pm


to 6am curfew, but Cox says it is not a constraint on services as flights typically don’t need to operate in the curfew hours. “Adelaide and South Australia are the next hot destinations. We are the food and wine capital of Australia, if not the world, and we are the WOW state – wildlife, outback and wine. “We have that existing underserved


market and market growth, so we are a very low-risk opportunity for an airline looking to commence a new service.” 


78 ISSUE 2 ROUTES NEWS 2019 routesonline.com


Tech it away


Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide Airports all say that automated processes are vital, but each is at a different stage of defining which technologies are the best fit for their terminals and customers.


Brisbane is focused on technology that makes the best use of existing terminal space while preparing for the doubling in aircraft movements when the new runway opens in 2020. The airport is piloting new security screening and biometric solutions that Brisbane Airport CEO Gert-Jan de Graaff says are making major differences to passenger efficiency. “Technology has always been a big part of what


we are doing, so the biometric solutions are part of our future. Sometimes by investing in technology, you can delay having to make investments in terminals,” he says.


The Melbourne vision is for no queues and capturing passenger faces early to unlock the pathway to boarding. Simple facial recognition, not biometrics, is what Melbourne Airport chief of aviation Simon Gandy wants in a system that just says “I’ve seen you before so you can come in”. The airport has 10 new security lanes to be equipped with scanning technology, allowing more items to be left in the bag and new, faster body scanners. “We are taking the best from Europe so we can parallel process passengers in seconds,” explains Gandy.


Adelaide has no capacity issues now,


but remains focused on installing more automated bag drops to reduce processing time and free up terminal space. The


Brenton Cox


roadblock to that is that their airlines are at different stages of maturity with technology, says executive general manager corporate and finance for Adelaide Airport


Brenton Cox. “We are driving hard at introducing automated


bag drop, but some carriers are not yet capable in terms of their software and processes to deal with it right now,” he says.


Adelaide Airport is aiming to introduce automated bag drops at its hub


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