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Cork Airport PROMOTION Why Cork region? Cork City from the air


Cork is home to some of Ireland’s top attractions, including Doneraile and Fota wildlife parks, which combined welcome close to one million visitors each year. Other key tourist attractions in the catchment include Blarney Castle and Gardens, which is home to the Blarney Stone and attracts half a million annual tourists, and the Crawford Art Gallery. Cork is Ireland’s second-largest city by both population and economic value. Over the last 25 years, Cork has continually attracted many of the world’s largest companies to locate within the region and is now home to several global market leaders in pharmaceuticals, healthcare, information and communications technology, biotechnology, cybersecurity and international fi nancial services. Cork is set to become the fastest growing city in


Ireland over the next 20 years, with its population expected to almost treble by 2040. The government’s recently unveiled Project Ireland 2040 scheme aims to divert growth to regions outside Dublin, with Cork penned as the main target for development. Just over 50% of offi ce space in the city in 2017


Cork City


was taken up by overseas companies while half a million non-Irish nationals live in Ireland. The Irish economy is the fastest-growing in the


eurozone, with GDP growth of 7.2% in 2017, with expected growth of 7.5% for 2018 and 4.2% in 2019, according to IMF World Economic Outlook. The nation also has the youngest population in Europe, with 33% of the population being 25 and younger, with the Irish educational system ranked in the global top 10 for quality. This Irish population is also expected to grow by 20% by 2040. One of the leading economies in Europe in


Old Head Golf Links


technology (it is the European headquarters for Apple) the sector continues to be dominant for up-and-coming talent, with 30% of the 220,000 students who enrolled in third-level courses at Irish universities and colleges taking up STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) subjects. Ireland is also 11th in global scientifi c ranking for overall quality of scientifi c research, an impressive upward trajectory from a position of 48th just 13 years ago. This has given Cork a big student population, with


more than 35,000 across University College Cork and Cork Institute of Technology. As well as Apple, other technology-based


Oliver Plunkett Street


companies with offi ces in the region include Dell EMC, VMWare, Sanmina, Alps, Blizzard, Dell, Intel Security, Flex, Trend Micro, Tyco, IBM, Qualcomm, SolarWinds, Logitech, EMC and Netgear. According to the 2018 IMD World Competitiveness


Yearbook, Ireland was the fourth-best performer when it comes to international investment. One in fi ve jobs in Ireland is linked to Foreign


Direct Investment (FDI), and for every 10 jobs created by FDI in Ireland, eight more jobs are generated in the wider economy, according to IDA Ireland. A further 163,000 square metres of new


commercial offi ce space is being planned for Cork in the next few years. Meanwhile, keen golfers love to visit the region,


Albert Quay


thanks to its wide range of courses, including the Old Head Golf Links in Kinsale.


routesonline.com ROUTES NEWS 2019 ISSUE 2

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