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ROUTES AMERICAS Québec


Jetlines unveils Québec tie-up


Ultra low-cost start-up Jetlines has reached an agreement in principle to provide future service from Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport. The airline used Routes Americas


2019 to unveil the news in a joint announcement. “It’s a very promising market,” Jetlines CEO Javier Suarez said. “We’re going to give people in Québec City the kind of capacity they want, and they deserve.” The airport has been growing


steadily, averaging a healthy 7.2% compound annual growth rate in the past 15 years, and handled 1.8 million passengers in 2019. A new terminal in 2017 doubled its capacity. The airport’s president and CEO Gaëtan Gagné said signing up an LCC had been a key target for the airport, adding: “Bringing a low-cost option to Québec City was one of our top priorities for the future and one of the reasons we’ve expanded our terminal. “I am delighted to see that


this strategy is paying off, and we welcome Jetlines with enthusiasm.” Jetlines has not announced a start


date, but Suarez underscored that plans to get the airline flying in 2019 remain on track. The airline recently revealed that


Vancouver International Airport will serve as its home airport, and Montréal’s secondary airport, Aéroport Montréal Saint-Hubert Longueuil, will be part of its network.


ROUTES NEWS VOX POP


Firms urged to work together


Tourist boards and other government bodies can play a key role in continuing to drive route development. Speaking during a panel debate,


Aerodom/VINCI Airports CCO Alvaro Leite said some of the company’s airports will share some added revenue with an airline that starts a new leisure route. He added more companies should


start sharing risk and reward as part of joint efforts to develop and grow routes. Leite said: “At the end of the


day, it needs to be a circle between the [national] governments, local authorities, hotels, tour operators and airlines. If this circle works well, everyone is going to have more revenue. That’s why it’s so important to work together.”


TUI aviation manager airport


commercial negotiations, Simon Elliott, said he tries to convey to airport partners that TUI’s business isn’t about filling airplanes, but rather selling end-user experiences. He added: “As a company, we fill


resorts or cruise ships, then we fill the aircraft. We try to develop with the airport how to best serve our customers.” Michèle Barre, VP network,


Daniel Pauli, manager network planning, the Americas, Lufthansa Group


revenue management and pricing at Air Transat, added airlines understood the importance of long-term partnerships and the need to invest upfront.


opportunity to connect with our airports and other stakeholders. It is a very efficient way of getting up to date on the market and hear how our routes are performing.


“Routes Americas is always the prime ”


ROUTES NEWS VOX POP


Alvaro Leite, CCO, Aerodom/VINCI Airports “2019 will be a good year for us, with


traffic rising in three of our airports, and we are working here to maintain that in 2020. We’re looking at new opportunities, especially in South America.


” 28 ISSUE 2 ROUTES NEWS 2019 routesonline.com Québec Port Authority cruise


market director Nancy Houley said her region has teamed up to market the local St Lawrence River’s nine ports of call and targets companies according to the size of their ships and suitability of each port. Xavier Mufraggi, CEO, Club Med North America and the Caribbean, said that there is a more fundamental shift taking place between mass-market tourists and those looking for exclusive boutique resorts and experiences, with airports and governments needing to respond accordingly.


Canada eyes tourism boom


Canada is hoping to more than double tourism revenues by 2030 as it seeks to create 180,000 jobs. The Canadian government’s minister of


tourism, official languages and la Francophonie Mélanie Joly said Canadian tourism was


worth $21 billion in 2017. The country is targeting raising $46 billion annually in tourism receipts in 11 years’ time by promoting everything from local skills to hospitality, while also targeting the LGBTQ market.


Joly also spoke about the need to


make travelling to the country easier and cited the example of Mexico, where visa requirements were liberalised in December 2016, causing a 50% increase in visitor numbers to the country in 2017 and 11% in 2018. She added the ambitious target


comes after Canada lost ground to some of its rivals, having fallen out of the top 10 most popular countries, which it last held in the early part of the previous decade. “Tourism hasn’t been getting


the respect it deserves as a major economic driver,” added Joly.


The panel discussed the importance of long-term partnerships for route development


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