search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS Update


Boeing to launch 737 Max upgrade


Boeing could have an upgrade for the software thought to be responsible for the recent deadly crashes of two of its Boeing 737 Max 8 available by the end of March.


In the same week that Routes News went to press in mid-March, the aircraft manufacturer’s president, chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg said the company was working with the relevant authorities to identify the causes of the second crash of the new aircraft. The aircraft was fl ying for Ethiopian Airlines


from Addis Ababa to Nairobi on March 10 when it crashed shortly after take-off, killing all 157 people onboard.


The incident came just over fi ve months after a


Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed into the sea on October 29 shortly after take-off, and killing all 189 passengers onboard. While the fi nal causes of the crash in Africa are yet


to be confi rmed, reports of events leading to the recent crash suggest some similarity to that in Indonesia, with pilots struggling against the aircraft’s new Manoeuvring Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) system. The feature was designed to assist pilots by detecting if the aircraft is close to stalling and automatically applies nose-down trim. Following the US Federal Aviation Administration’s


(FAA) decision to follow suit with the rest of the world and ban the aircraft from fl ying in the US, Boeing has said it will soon have an upgrade for the software, with rumours suggesting it would be available by the end of the month. Muilenburg said: “Soon we’ll release a software


update and related pilot training for the 737 Max that will address concerns discovered in the aftermath of the Lion Air Flight 610 accident.” Muilenburg added: “Based on facts from the


Lion Air Flight 610 accident and emerging data as it becomes available from the Ethiopian Airlines fl ight 302 accident, we’re taking actions to fully ensure the safety of the 737 Max. “Work is progressing thoroughly and rapidly to learn more about the Ethiopian Airlines accident


12 ISSUE 2 ROUTES NEWS 2019 routesonline.com


Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft have been grounded across the world following the Ethiopian Airlines crash


and understand the information from the airplane’s cockpit voice and fl ight data recorders.” The announcement came fi ve days after the US banned the aircraft, which is produced in Renton, Washington, from taking to the skies in its airspace.


Announcing the ban on March 13, the FAA said: “The agency made this decision as a result of the data-gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analysed today. This evidence, together with newly refi ned satellite data available to FAA this morning, led to this decision. “The grounding will remain in effect pending


further investigation, including examination of information from the aircraft’s fl ight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders.” The decision coincided with Boeing’s own announcement that day to support the grounding of the fl eet. A statement released that day added: “Boeing


continues to have full confi dence in the safety of the 737 Max. However, after consultation with the FAA, the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and aviation authorities, and its customers around the world, Boeing has determined – out of an abundance of caution and in order to reassure the fl ying public of the aircraft’s safety – to recommend to the FAA the temporary suspension of operations of the entire global fl eet of 371 737 Max aircraft.” The decision to ground the aircraft aligned the US with countries around the world, including the UK and Japan, which had already done so. China was the fi rst country to ban the aircraft, the day after the Africa crash. Even once the aircraft is allowed back in the skies, winning over consumer, and crew, confi dence may prove to be a tougher sale. However, with 371 Max aircraft already built and with orders for 4,600 more, which some airlines have already said they would honour pending the results of the latest investigation, reassuring the public of the safety of the aircraft is surely now key.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112