search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Jennifer Morris 020 3714 4115


jmorris@ttgmedia.com


second half of 2018, when 32 of our 42 Dreamliners on order will have been put into service,” Kjos added. Norwegian’s capacity rose 25% in 2017 and will rise again this year, with available seat kilometres, the standard measure of capacity, increasing by 40% in 2018. The carrier said demand in the early


part of 2018 had been “satisfactory”, but added: “Norwegian may decide to adjust capacity to optimise the route portfolio depending on the development in the overall economy and in the marketplace.” Kjos was in London last week to


confi rm Gatwick as the centre of his expansion plans, hinting at more services to the US and Asia to come. He said he could have expanded at a slower pace but that no slots would be available at key airports “in two or three years”. Norwegian will have 12 787s at Gatwick this year.


CONSOLIDATOR BRAND


Partner carriers boost Aviate revenue by 55%


FLIGHT CONSOLIDATOR Aviate says it has seen a 55% spike in revenue for the fi rst seven months of its fi nancial year after signing a swathe of new partner carriers. The B2B brand, which off ers net


fares from 50 major airlines, is aiming to generate revenue of £93 million for the full 2017-18 fi nancial year ending in June after securing deals with carriers including Eva Air, Finnair and Norwegian. Managing director Mike Edwards


said growth meant Aviate, set up in 2009, would outperform its older sister brand Lime from a UK perspective at the end of 2018. Lime provides discounted British Airways


Mike Edwards


tickets and is BA’s main consolidator brand for tour operators. It is forecast to turn over £105 million this year. Edwards said Aviate’s growth was


taking several forms. “We added what we call regional fl ying last year; point-to-point destinations like


Dubai to Mauritius or Cape Town to Johannesburg. It’s grown massively. We introduced technology to allow it and we contracted net fares.” Aviate is also expanding its


outsourcing business. It operates Virgin Flightstore for the carrier and says it is in talks with other airlines interested in similar arrangements. Aviate’s growth has been rapid in the past few years; in 2014/15, the company worked with 10 airlines, generating £21.2 million in revenue. This grew to £38.7 million in 2015/16 and hit £60.7 million in 2016-17. As well as its UK sales, it handles BA and Iberia group sales from North America. Edwards is the majority


shareholder in the business with a 39.5% stake. Three other individuals hold the rest of the equity. He ruled out any plans for a sale of the company. “Absolutely not, we want to grow – there are still some people that have never heard of us,” he said.


ev Make a Haven Easter booking


between 19 Feb - 18 Mar 2018 for breaks between 30 Mar - 13 Apr 2018, hop on over to


BourneLeisureSales.co.uk and complete the incentive form to be entered into our weekly prize draw to WIN one of these prizes...


2ND Hamper Terms and conditions apply. To book visit BourneLeisureSales.co.uk Brainz Agent Hub @BourneAgents #HopToHaven


PRIZE: Easter


h H 3RD


PRIZE: Easter


Treat


si


1ST


PRIZE: Family


Haven break


n a


EASTER BREAKS per


3 NIGHT


from only


£199 family


H


s


o


p


E


t


o


t


a


t


e


r


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90