search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
of the week


BIG LEAPS Australian firms have led


the way in the travel industry towards helping the country’s


wildfire crisis. Intrepid’s Red Cross Bushfire Emergency Appeal has topped $500,000 and APT has donated $100,000 via its One Tomorrow Charitable Fund. The fires have claimed dozens of lives, while experts predict more than a billion animals have perished.


Pic


TOURS CANCELLED AMID IRAN TENSIONS


James Chapple


Operators, cruise lines and airlines are on standby to alter or cancel tours, calls and itineraries, or reroute flights, after a major escalation in tensions in the Middle East last week. It follows the death of Iranian general


Qasem Soleimani in a US drone strike. Iran retaliated with missile attacks on two Iraqi military bases hosting US troops. The Foreign Office (FCO) is advising


IN BRIEF


Travelex insisted last week there was no evidence personal customer data had been encrypted or “exfiltrated” after the foreign exchange firm was hit by a ransomware attack on New Year’s Eve. When TTG went to press last week, Travelex had admitted it did not yet have a “complete picture” of all the data affected.


Willie Walsh is to retire this summer having announced he will step down as chief executive of British Airways’ parent International Airlines Group on 26 March. Iberia chief executive, Luis Gallego, will succeed him.


On the Beach achieved the “highest uplift” in brand awareness for a Christmas TV advertising campaign, according to a YouGov analysis. The OTA boosted consumer awareness and consideration scores thanks to its “everything’s better…” messaging, with ads featuring the voice of rock star Iggy Pop.


ADVENTURE OPS REACT AS MIDDLE EAST CRISIS MOUNTS


Adventure specialists have suggested rising tensions in the Middle East could lead to a boost for other lesser- known destinations. David McGuinness, founder of Travel


the Unknown, said “a slowdown for the Middle East might serve some countries a little further to the east well”. “The Silk Road countries of Central


Asia (the “Stans”) might be well placed to benefit; the Caucasus region or Georgia and Armenia too. We have seen strong growth already in these destinations and they may well capitalise if there is a slowdown in the Middle East.” Elsewhere, Aled Evans, head of business development at Undiscovered Destinations, expects “fewer [Middle East] enquiries in the coming months as people are put off travelling to the Middle East as a whole”. He added the operator’s tours in nearby destinations Jordan and Oman remained unaffected, but said Undiscovered Destinations would be “reviewing our capacity” in the region following the crisis.


Read the columns at ttgmedia.com


against all travel to Iraq except essential travel to Kurdistan and all but essential travel to Iran. It also warns of an increased threat to western interests in other countries, including Egypt, Turkey and the UAE, where it says the security situation “could worsen with little warning”. A number of tour operators have


taken immediate action. Wild Frontiers has pulled all its Iran tours until the autumn, while Dragoman Overland has cancelled its early year departures. “Iran is a no-go at the moment,” said Dragoman sales and business development director Charlie Hopkinson. The European Aviation Safety Agency


(EASA) has ordered European carriers to avoid Iraqi airspace. It was due to assess the implications for flying over Iran, the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman at a meeting on Friday (10 January). British Airways and Virgin Atlantic


are among the carriers to have confirmed reroutings.


FCO is warning against all travel to Iran

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96