search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS


AGENTS REACT TO ST LUCIA’S ACCOMMODATION LEVY


Jennifer Morris, news editor


CAA APOLOGISES OVER DELAYS TO COOK REFUNDS


The CAA has apologised for delays refunding Thomas Cook passengers after the operator’s failure in September. So far the authority has settled 320,000


claims, 95% of those received to date, at a value of more than £310 million in Atol payments. This is up from 90% at Christmas.


The CAA said 10,000 more outstanding claims were being processed “as a matter of urgency” but it was yet to receive claims for “thousands” more forward Cook bookings and is urging anyone with a valid claim to lodge it as soon as possible. It added delays repaying certain claims “in most cases” were a result of claimants providing details that do not exactly match Cook’s booking records. “We have a dedicated team working


through the remaining claims in order to support consumers and process Atol payments as quickly as possible,” said the CAA in an update issued last Wednesday (8 January).


TWO NEW STORES FOR MILLINGTON


Midlands miniple Millington Travel has opened new stores in Rugby and Hinckley (pictured), taking on former Thomas Cook staff. The new stores take Millington’s network to 14. The Rugby agency, located in The Swan Centre, has a team of five, and the Hinckley store, on Castle Street, a team of seven. Nigel Armitage, co-founder of the Travel Network Group member, described the towns as “thriving”.


Agents have sounded a note of caution after St Lucia announced a “tourist accommodation fee” on hotels, guesthouses, villas, apartments and Airbnb stays to fund destination marketing and development. From 1 April visitors will be charged a


nightly rate of US$3 on accommodation costing up to US$120 a night, and US$6 on accommodation above US$120. Accommodation sourced through


sharing platforms such as Airbnb or VRBO will be subject to a 7% tourist accommodation fee on the full cost of the stay. Funds accrued via the charges will be used to finance destination marketing activities by the Saint Lucia Tourism Authority (SLTA) in key markets, including the UK and Europe. “The business of promoting a tourism destination is becoming increasingly challenging and highly competitive as countries worldwide try to capture a greater share of the growing tourist market,” said the SLTA. St Lucia attracts some 350,000 stay-


over visitors annually and is targeting 541,000 by 2022. The SLTA also wants to increase airlift to the island nation and


load factors on all flights into St Lucia to 85% and beyond. Paul Rice, partner at Off Broadway


Travel, said: “While it’s only a small amount, people just don’t like paying extra. That said, most of the world seems to be making a charge now and most clients just pay it.” Declan Hughes, director at Fly Cruise


Stay, agreed. “The price you see should be the price you pay,” he said, adding: “Although if you can afford to visit St Lucia, I would expect you can afford to pay $3-$6 a night in tax. “If the fund is spent wisely and the island as a whole benefits, then that’s a positive all round.”


TTG poll


Generally, do you think tourism taxes are a good idea?


No, deterring visitors is bad for local economies 60%


Yes, they’re an effective tool for managing overtourism


40%


8 TRAVEL TRADE GAZETTE 13.01.2020


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96