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DESTINATIONS ASM


Chubu Centrair International (NGO) – Guam International (GUM)


Carrier: HK Express Aircraft: Airbus A320 Frequency: three/week


Start date: October 31, 2017 Distance: 2,524km


O&D traffic demand (2016): 140,291 (from Nagoya) Annual growth: -21%


Average one-way fare: $370


Insight Japan is by far the largest source market for visitors to the island of Guam, so it is no surprise to see a greater number of airlines investing in capacity between the two markets. Demand has dropped slightly in recent years, in line with general Japanese outbound leisure trends, due to the country’s economic situation. As a result, Guam has lost some of its Japanese services recently, including the cancellation of Delta’s service to Nagoya in 2016. This resulted in United Airlines having no competition on the route in recent months and the entry of a second carrier, at a time when the Japanese economy is recovering will stimulate tourist demand for Guam from Nagoya.


Data


Insight This announcement marks the return of TACA on the San Salvador to Newark route, after it was previously operated between November 2013 and January 2015. As much as 75% of the traffic on the route historically was connecting behind San Salvador from markets such as Guayaquil, Quito and Guatemala City, but very little of the traffic would connect beyond Newark. The New Jersey hub recently had its slot restrictions lifted by the FAA, easing the previous restrictions placed on airline operators at peak times, allowing the airline to slightly tweak the schedule compared to the historic service. This will enable better connectivity at both ends of the route, assuming a co-operation with fellow Star Alliance carrier United Airlines.


Data Carrier: TACA Airlines


Aircraft: Airbus A319/320 Frequency: five/week


Start date: November 17, 2017 Distance: 3,387km


O&D traffic demand (2016): 156,894 (to New York) Annual growth: 14% Average one-way fare: $255


San Salvador International (ZSA) – Newark Liberty


International (EWR)


Riga International (RIX) –


Mérignac (BOD) Data Carrier: airBaltic


Start date: June 3, 2018 Distance: 2,183km


Annual growth: 25% Average one-way fare: $176


Bordeaux-


Aircraft: Boeing 737-500 Frequency: two/week


O&D traffic demand (2016): 1,885


Insight airBaltic has just announced its summer 2018 new services, with five new points on its network map: Gdansk, Lison, Malaga, Split and Bordeaux. The carrier has been taking the new C-series into the fleet and is now using the Boeing 737s to develop more leisure-orientated


routes to provide outbound destinations to the population of Latvia. The twice-weekly


Bordeaux service is no exception,


targeting the leisure market. Bordeaux is starting to build its connections to Eastern Europe - the airport has attracted a Wizz Air service, also starting next summer on March 25, 2018, from Warsaw. £


90 ISSUE 5 ROUTES NEWS 2017 routesonline.com


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