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DESTINATIONS Travel Foundation


to hear, to avoid the increased fuel burn the additional take-off requires. He adds more effective air traffic control can time an aircraft’s arrival at the airport with minimal waiting time before landing, while getting rid of certain no-fly zones imposed by some countries would lead to more direct and cleaner flights.


Could aviation do more?


Inside the cabin, Lynam believes airlines could do more on the recycling front while the space given to customers flying first class may be luxurious, it is not terribly green. Nor is a half-full aircraft, he adds.


But this does not mean he is singling out aviation, which he recognises is mostly essential in getting holidaymakers to their chosen destination. Instead Lynam adds: “We all need to fly and we all want to fly; it is not about scapegoating aviation. It needs to be a bigger concern for the whole of travel and tourism.”


Nor does he believe airlines should let


consumers take the lead on this, as he recognises no matter how well educated they might be about the dangers of not curbing emissions, many still equate using the greenest airlines with paying more. Lynam adds: “The reality is for a lot of people it comes down to price. People want to minimalise the damage they do and are trying to be conscious consumers but at the same time the real challenge has to happen at the corporate level.” And Lynam believes this process is already


under way. More efficient aircraft not only tick the sustainable box but are cheaper to run, while half-empty flights don’t fill the airlines’ pockets. He agrees the industry is making steps in both these areas with new aircraft design and better seat-selling strategies and believes the introduction of the Carbon Offset and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation in 2020 will further drive standards. He is also confident that airlines are


recognising the need for the destinations they fly to to be sustainable, too. Lynam says: “You don’t want to invest in routes to areas where there are infrastructure issues or unhappy residents that are not giving a warm welcome to the visitors. You don’t want tourism that is taking resources from the local population or causing any damage that doesn’t make sense from a business perspective. You don’t need to be a tree hugger for that to make sense.” This is why Lynam will also be using


World Routes to speak to as many tourism boards as possible in the hope of building new relationships.


He adds: “It is hopefully a perfect time


to have a conversation about what sort of impacts they might have and what they want to achieve from welcoming tourism to their shores. Whether you are investing


82 ISSUE 5 ROUTES NEWS 2017 routesonline.com w


Managing airlines’ CO2 footprint


Airlines are reconising the need for the destinations they fly to to be sustainable


The Carbon Offset


and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) is an agreement


signed by the 191 member states of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO). The agreement will require aircraft


operators to purchase offsets for the growth of carbon dioxide emissions covered by the scheme, which will be set at 2020 levels. During the initial phase of its


introduction – from 2021 to 2026 – the scheme will be voluntary before becoming mandatory for all member states in 2027. Following the signing of the


Operators will have to purchase offsets for the growth of CO2 emissions


agreement on October 2016, IATA director general and CEO Alexandre de Juniac said: “The historic significance of this agreement cannot be overestimated. “CORSIA is the first global scheme covering an entire industrial sector. The CORSIA agreement has turned years of preparation into an effective solution for


airlines to manage their carbon footprint. “Aviation is a catalytic


driver of social development


and economic prosperity – it is the business of freedom making our world a better place.”


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