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DESTINATIONS Scandinavia In total, 24 million passengers have


flown to or from Swedavia’s airports in the first seven months of 2017, roughly two million more than 2016’s equivalent. Even so, Swedavia is eager to promote and obtain new routes and is working with a number of partners to explore opportunities. There is a marketing support programme and Axtelius reveals that an incentive scheme incorporates both new destination discounts and inducements for growing the number of passengers. Apart from this financial encouragement, Swedavia is continuously working on keeping the charges as competitive as possible. “Our most wanted, unserved


intercontinental destinations at Stockholm Arlanda are Tokyo, Toronto, Shanghai and Boston,” says Axtelius. “Within Europe, we are looking forward to routes to Hannover, Sofia, Marseilles and destinations in Scandinavia like Oulu, Aalborg and Kristiansand. We do also need better connectivity or increased frequencies to Bologna, Nice, Venice, Stavanger and Bergen.” Axtelius adds there is “a lot of potential” in the Swedish market. To handle the projected growth and ensure an improved customer service, Stockholm Arlanda will benefit from a new pier, Airbus A380 facilities, US preclearance, a new hotel and more passenger self-service options.


Remote control Also helping is a air navigation service provider (ANSP). LFV pioneered the remote tower – a means of providing air navigation services from a control room located away from the airport. Combined with its implementation of other cutting- edge technologies, LFV is facilitating route development in the country. In fact, innovative air traffic management (ATM) is a feature throughout Scandinavia. Denmark’s air navigation Service Provider, Naviair is a partner in a project to provide space- based automatic dependent surveillance – broadcast services, for example. This groundbreaking technology essentially provides flight visibility across the entire planet for equipped aircraft. Naviair also provides services in


Greenland and the Faroe Islands and is a partner in the COOPANS Alliance, which involves harmonised systems in seven control centres in five European countries. Copenhagen’s Kastrup Airport (CPH) is taking advantage of advanced ATM by extending its network. Passenger numbers grew 2.3% in the first six months of 2017 compared with the same period last year. Weekly departures and destinations served have both been increased in recent years. The number of weekly intercontinental departures


72 ISSUE 5 ROUTES NEWS 2017 routesonline.com


Stockholm Arlanda Airport is the fastest growing among Scandinavian cities


has increased from 102 in 2012 to 134 in 2016, up more than 31%. In the same period, there was a 36% increase in the number of destinations served, from 25 to 34.


Oakland (California), Valencia and Turin


are all new to the CPH departures board this year, while other routes are benefitting from new entrants, like SAS flights to the Faroe Islands and Riga. Air India begins a direct Delhi service


from CPH in September. An analysis by DAMVAD Analytics shows that the route will contribute more than DKK250 million ($39.6 million) to Denmark’s economy. Summing up, Thomas Woldbye, CEO of Copenhagen Airports, notes: “Danes are travelling more frequently, and Denmark has become an attractive destination for many tourists, particularly from southern Europe. We seek to continue this development with Expanding CPH, our plan to expand the airport to accommodate more than 40 million passengers a year.”


Air navigation ambitions Meanwhile, Norwegian air services provider and airport operator Avinor is equally bullish about its prospects. On the air navigation side, it has committed to iTEC (interoperability through European collaboration), joining several other ANSPs in employing an advanced air traffic control system designed to meet the SESAR (Single European


Sky ATM R&D)


Thomas Woldbye, CEO of Copenhagen Airports


requirements of the w


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