search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
DESTINATIONS Russia


A new football stadium being built in Rostov- on-Don, Russia


from cities around the world, so managing the logistics shouldn’t be too problematic. The 50,000 supporters expected from Mexico, for example, will all arrive together in a short space of time. “Most supporters won’t risk trying to


organise independent travel because the country is so vast, although you will get some fans from European countries jetting in and out.”


Visa scheme Plenty of effort is being put into making things simple for foreign fans. A new visa-waiver scheme – trialled during this summer’s Confederations Cup – will ease entry to the country, while over the past two years World Cup airports have held a series of workshops in association with Fifa and Rosaviation aimed at smoothing passenger flows and getting ready for all eventualities. Konstantin Trofimenko, associate


professor of urbanism at Moscow’s Higher School of Economics, explains: “However, transporting fans from city to city will require original solutions considering the dense match schedule and the long distances involved. How this will be done is still not known, since it hasn’t been decided on a federal level.” While supporters will be most concerned


about how they get to see their heroes, it is likely that politicians, administrators and airlines are more concerned about the post- World Cup result. International carriers have privately


complained about higher airport fees for them, compared to their Russian counterparts, and the country’s own credit ratings agency, ACRA, has admitted things might not improve on that front. While domestic airlines look to benefit from better infrastructure by adding routes, it warns airports might be heavily indebted by the capital expenditure forced on them, and foreign users could pay the price. £


68 ISSUE 5 ROUTES NEWS 2017 routesonline.com


Kick-off for improvements in Russia


IATA is hopeful the


World Cup delivers a higher goal – an adoption of


international aviation


standards across Russia. Having branded the


country’s visa regime as one of the


Moscow Sheremetyevo Airport


world’s “least-friendly”, IATA CEO Alexandre de Juniac has been cheered by the way Russia plans to improve its airports. “More tourists can only be of benefit to Russia, which already derives 1.6% of its GDP and 1.1 million jobs from aviation activities and air tourism,” he says. “It is refreshing infrastructure issues are well in hand. Russia is one of the few countries of the world where the correct investments are being made… the work done on the main international gateways has been impressive. Also welcome has been the rationalisation of air traffic control centres.” Russia has already taken steps


to ratify Montreal Convention 99 (MC99), which sets liability standards for passenger and recognises electronic documentation. IATA is also urging the country to adopt Montreal Protocol14, which sets international rules on dealing with unruly travellers, as well as the CORSIA rules on limiting carbon emissions. While 190 nations have agreed to take part in this offsetting scheme, which begins in 2020, Russia is currently a notable absence.


Pic capition for here please


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144