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Awards WORLD ROUTES


Yil Surehan Director, airline route development,


Massport-Boston Logan International Airport


Yil has been with Massport/Boston Logan International Airport for more than 12 years following time at United Airlines and Alaska Airlines. Over the past decade, the number


of international non-stop destinations from Logan has nearly doubled from 27 to 53 and international passengers now account for 16% of travellers. The airport handled a record 36.3 million passengers in 2016, marking its sixth year in a row for record- breaking traffic.


In June, Avianca launched Logan’s first non-stop South American route, with a year-round service from Boston to Colombia’s capital Bogotá four times weekly on an Airbus A319. It now has non-stop flights to South


America, Central America, the Caribbean, Europe, Asia and the Middle East. In total, Logan Airport generates $13 billion in economic activity each year and new international routes are estimated to bring an economic benefit of more than $1 billion annually.


Beat Kisseleff International network planning manager, Air New Zealand


National carrier Air New Zealand grew its capacity by 6% to 19.6 million seats in 2016 and it is forecast to rise to more than 20.3 million in 2017. The airline’s strategy of diversifying


its network across the Pacific Rim and throughout New Zealand has proven successful, with strong performances from both the Houston and Buenos Aires routes in their first year of operation. The Star Alliance member has also


increased awareness of its long-haul capabilities in the Australian market,


with the launch of a “Better Way to Fly” campaign. Notable new routes include a Haneda


Airport service from Auckland, offering customers a second point of entry to the Japanese capital alongside the airline’s daily flights to Narita Tokyo Airport. The direct route will boost annual capacity to Japan by about 15%. Japan is one of New Zealand’s


fastest-growing outbound travel markets, with the number of Kiwis travelling to Japan up 25% to the year to May 2017.


Hampton Brown Sr Director, air service development,


San Diego County Regional Airport Authority


The San Diego County Regional Airport Authority was created in 2003 and manages the day-to-day operations of San Diego International Airport. Under its guidance, the single- runway airport has grown strongly and in 2016 saw total passenger volume increase to a record 20 million. It has also become one of the foremost economic drivers in San Diego County, generating approximately $10 billion in annual economic impact for the region.


In recent years the airport has added Frankfurt, Zurich and Vancouver to its growing list of international destinations following the success of its link to London Heathrow. Condor Airlines announced in May 2017 it was introducing a new service between San Diego and Frankfurt, while Lufthansa confirmed in June it would also offer direct flights to Frankfurt on a year-round basis beginning in March 2018. Lufthansa has never served SAN before.


routesonline.com ROUTES NEWS 2016 ISSUE 5 117


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