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ANA AIRLINES


vice-president and member of the board at ANA Holdings Inc, says the optimal use of slots at Haneda and Narita airports will help the airline capture travel demand from the local Japanese market, inbound foreign travellers and those passengers transiting in Japan as they journey from the US to Asia. “ANA also continues to strengthen its existing routes and expand new services to ‘white spots’ in Asia and Central and South America,” he says. “It will further expand its network by engaging in more integrated joint ventures or seeking new partnership with other carriers.” ANA Holdings recently announced


a codeshare agreement with Vietnam Airlines, for example, a carrier in which it already has an 8.8% stake. The agreement will initially cover 10 international routes, linking Japan and Vietnam, and 25 domestic routes. There is also a reciprocal arrangement on the carriers’ frequent-flyer programmes. “The cooperation with ANA Holdings,


which owns a leading global airline with excellent service quality, has important meaning in the development of Vietnam Airlines as it helps us to diversify our products and improve our competitiveness on the international market,” says Duong Tri Thanh, president and CEO of Vietnam Airlines. “Through strategic long-term development, cooperation and experiences from ANA, Vietnam Airlines’ goal of becoming a five-star airline will certainly be more reachable.” By the end of 2020 financial year, the


The years ahead will be busy ones for Japan’s largest airline


$1.72bn: ANA’s projected profit


by 2020


ANA Holdings Inc’s Toyoyuki Nagamine


Dual hub strategy The focus on international passenger revenues will make full use of additional slots at Haneda Airport in downtown Tokyo. In total, an additional 39,000 international flight movements will be possible by 2020. Naturally enough, ANA won’t be neglecting Narita International Airport in the nearby Chiba prefecture either. This dual-hub strategy will be complemented by the “Tokyo triple bank” model that creates three waves of flights for easy connectivity. The focus at Haneda will be on morning and late night, with early evening the cornerstone of the Narita operation. Toyoyuki Nagamine, executive


international available seat kilometres on offer from ANA Holdings will grow by half, reaching 151% of the 2015 total. In terms of domestic service, Nagamine suggests the key to profitability is right- sizing the aircraft. In a nutshell, that means widebody aircraft in times of high demand and narrowbody aircraft in times of low demand. “ANA also intends to capture growing demand from inbound tourists to connect to domestic flights, especially from the Asian region where economic growth continues,” he adds. An enhanced travel experience will also play its part on the domestic network, including in-flight Wi-Fi, free access to the latest news on real-time live TV and the introduction of new seat products. Perhaps the most critical element in the domestic equation, however, is the introduction of the new Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ). It is due to enter service in mid-2018, with ANA the launch customer, a position the airline also held with the Boeing 787. But, not unlike the 787 situation, the MRJ project has been dogged by delays. The manufacturer warned the airline in October 2016 of a possible further delay for “technical reasons”, although this has yet to be confirmed.


w routesonline.com ROUTES NEWS 2017 ISSUE 1 15

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