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AIRLINES ANA AIRLINES


GOING FOR GOLD


All Nippon Airways will need Olympian fortitude if it is to achieve the ambitious targets in the five-year corporate strategy WORDS: GRAHAM NEWTON


I


n 2020, as the Olympic flame burns brightly in Tokyo’s National Olympic Stadium,


All Nippon Airways (ANA) is hoping to celebrate its own gold-medal performance. At the end of that financial year ending


March 31, 2020, the carrier’s parent ANA Holdings has targeted 40% increases in its international passenger and cargo revenues compared with 2015; a tripling of revenues from its low-cost carrier (LCC) subsidiary, Vanilla Air; the smooth introduction of three Airbus A380s; and a sizeable $1.72 billion profit. As with any medal-winning achievement, hard work is the bedrock for success. That means a busy few years


14 ISSUE 1 ROUTES NEWS 2017 routesonline.com


ahead for an airline that has grown to be Japan’s largest.


Both tailwinds and headwinds will


buffet the airline in its efforts. There’s the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo to look forward to, of course; continuing growth in many neighbouring Asian countries; a relaxation in local visa requirements and improvements in Japanese infrastructure, both on the ground and in the air. Conversely, high operating costs


continue to dampen demand, a situation made worse by a faltering economy and the appreciation of the yen. The slowdown in Chinese growth could also prove influential.

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