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REVIEWS


SINGAPORE AIRLINES Business Class


Stretching out in a soft leather armchair, feet up, movie on and with a glass of gently fizzing champagne in hand. Not only is that my idea of a good night in, but it’s my idea of a good flight out too – and Singapore Airlines’ Business Class from Heathrow certainly didn’t disappoint. The first impression upon boarding the upper deck of the A380 is undoubtedly space – there’s lots of it, and it’s put to good use with plenty of space-saving measures to ensure passengers feel the full benefit of all that extra room. Not only does that mean somewhere to stretch out, but to curl up too, with armchair- style seats (34 inches wide) that wouldn’t look out of place in a country manor house. The colour scheme pairs neutral beige and chocolate brown leather, accented with bright turquoise cushions, and the style statements don’t stop there: female flight attendants wear the famous sarong kebaya made from batik fabric, which must surely rank as the most beautiful airline uniform ever created. Seats are all forward-facing in a one-


two-one configuration allowing everyone direct aisle access, and enough privacy that lone travellers need not feel obliged to talk to their neighbour. That said, couples


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travelling together will find the middle pair a comfortable choice, whether they want to chat over dinner or sit back and watch a film in peace. Though with noise- cancelling headphones and a 15.4-inch screen, it’s a good excuse to get absorbed in a movie and ignore any interruptions from your other half.


Dining options are ample, with a mix of lightly-spiced Singaporean dishes and Western-style classics, which can be chosen in advance with a Book the Cook service. Signature champagnes include Krug and Dom Perignon, and there’s an air sommelier to advise on pairings from a selection of wines chosen by wine author Oz Clarke and Masters of Wine Michael Hill Smith and Jeannie Cho Lee. You’d be forgiven for thinking that’s the best of this Business Class service. You’ve done fine wine, good entertainment and a comfy seat – but it’s only when the seat is folded down into a lie-flat bed connecting with the leather footrest that the real value comes to bear. Unlike some airline


92 — aspire september 2017


seats, which seem to need an engineering degree to make them into beds, it’s easy to do yourself and doesn’t require endless sheets and blankets, though staff are on hand to oblige if needed. It’s adjustable, using a panel of buttons to the side, and supremely roomy at 6ft 4in, allowing even the tallest of passengers to stretch out for a good night’s sleep. It’s the little details that set this


service apart – the reading light on both sides of the seat instead of just one, the working desk big enough to spread out on, the amenities available in the bathrooms rather than in an individual kit – justifying its higher price point with a host of little courtesies. And I’d raise a glass of champers to that…


BOOK IT: A return fare from Heathrow to Singapore in Business Class starts at £3,445.


SINGAPOREAIR.COM Katie McGonagle


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