search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
CHINA


BEST VANTAGE POINTS IN SHANGHAI


ABOVE: Hollie and her husband Matthew on a motorbike tour of the French Concession in Shanghai 1


dead during student-led protests and demonstrations in 1989. Many locals, including guides, still feel uncomfortable talking about this. Tourists visiting Beijing should plan their time wisely because what may look like a 10-minute walk on a map is more likely to take an hour – especially when you factor in the poor air quality, which can leave you feeling lethargic.


MODERN SHANGHAI


More modern and diverse is sparkling and space-age Shanghai, where I ended my Chinese love affair. This city is a mix of old and new, with the former slowly disappearing before locals’ eyes. The newer PuDong area is just 20


years old but boasts some of the tallest skyscrapers in the world, while the Pu Xi area, which comprises The Bund waterfront, the French Concession and the English Concession, features remnants of days gone by. Within Pu Xi’s Old Town area you’ll still find narrow alleyways packed with rickety traditional houses and families living


66 — aspire september 2017


in very confined spaces. This side of the city is changing rapidly as the government looks to knock down these rundown homes and rehouse locals in high-rise buildings. A visit to the French Concession – known as the Paris of the Orient – is worthwhile. It’s full of cool cafes and museums; I explored it on a motorbike and sidecar tour of the area. But the first port of call for most visitors to Shanghai is The Bund promenade, which has English-style historic landmarks, inspired by the Royal Liver Building in Liverpool, on one side and vertigo-inducing skyscrapers across the Huangpu River. Take the Shanghai Bund Sightseeing


Tunnel to get between the two areas – it’s a fun way to travel, as the short underground train journey comes with a technicolour light show! I had not been on the hunt for another shooting star, but the bright lights of the skyscrapers – best seen from The Bund – provided a mesmerising sight.


FLAIR, THE RITZ-CARLTON: Super- trendy and with one of the city’s best views, this bar and restaurant sits on the 58th floor of the HSBC building.


2


POP BAR, THREE ON THE BUND: This rooftop bar is well known for its views across to PuDong; the afternoon tea is also worth enjoying.


3


THE BUND: A trip to Shanghai isn’t complete without a stroll along the Bund, with stunning views across to the high-rises of PuDong (pictured).


BOOK IT


Abercrombie & Kent offers a 13-night Classic China itinerary from £4,495, including international flights and a three-night cruise on the Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer. The cruise can also be booked independently from £995 for a sailing next year.


SANCTUARYRETREATS.COM ABERCROMBIEKENT.COM


PICTURES: SHUTTERSTOCK; HOLLIE-RAE BRADER


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104