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DISCOVERY Q


DISCOVERY


A regular feature showcasing some of the more novel innovations to reach The Marine Professional newsdesk


TURBOCHARGERS


3D printed nozzles to the rescue


TRU-MARINE: Turbocharger service company Tru-Marine has printed the world’s first nozzle ring for marine turbochargers using an exotic super metal alloy. The premature erosion of


nozzle rings is a commonly reported problem, creating unplanned vessel downtime. In such situations spare part replacements are often unavaila- ble and/or come with long lead times at high costs. To address this, Tru-Marine developed a proprietary 3D printing process that enables the reconstruction of worn out areas directly onto the original nozzle. The company says damaged


nozzle rings can now be reclaimed to ‘like-new’ condition either as an intermediary option, or as a reconditioned spare part, within a fraction of the time required by commonplace repair methods. Moreover, it is cheaper than conventional metalwoking production methods, which tend to work out expensive for one-off or short runs of components. Additive printing also leads to


simpler designs that do not incorporate fasteners or welded seams, thus enhancing perfor- mance and reducing production and delivery times. Components can be made of multiple metal alloys or exotic materials to improve their physical properties. Yielding positive results in


63


At the conclusion of the project, investigators


wanted to remove the tracking devices to


mitigate any long term impact on the animals


tensile strength and microstruc- ture laboratory examinations, the 3D printed nozzle rings have been found to be suitable for turbo- charger applications. The develop- ment programme was supported by government agencies and local research institutions.


WILDLIFE TRACKING Turtle treasure quest


JW FISHERS: Metal detectors supplied by search equipment manufacturer JW Fishers are helping scientists relocate marine species that have been fitted with transmitters containing metallic elements after research projects have finished. During bridge construction at


the Canadian Lake Champlain, scientists from Quebec’s Ministry of Natural Resources and the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department wanted to under- stand how the work would affect the resident turtle population. More than 20 turtles were captured and fitted with transmit- ters, allowing them to be tracked and studied. At the conclusion of the project investigators wanted to remove the tracking devices to mitigate any long term impact on the animals. Richard Savignac, a Canadian


diving safety officer working with the group, reports: “We began the search by using a radio telemetry antenna on the surface to locate the approximate position of the


turtles on the bottom. Once a site had been identified, a diver was deployed. All test subjects were alive and well, and the transmit- ters were successfully detached.” Metal detection has also been


employed in Hong Kong, where green sea turtles are under threat from hunting and egg poachers. The turtles use the 200 islands that make up the Asian commer- cial hub as a key hatchery and the Department of Fisheries is using the system to protect them. Similarly, in Australia researchers are attaching metal tags on marine gastropods in order to keep track of the reclusive creatures (which hide in the rubble of reefs) as part of a stock replenishment programme.


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