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Q GLOBAL NEWS CURRENTS INBRIEF


sThe recently introduced 7ËRTSILË ENGINE, acknowledged by Guinness World Records as the world’s most efficient 4-stroke diesel engine, has been selected for an icebreaker currently under construction at the PJSC Vyborg Shipyard. The ship is being built on behalf of FSUE Atomflot, the enterprise of ROSATOM, the State Corporation for Atomic Energy. The new vessel will operate in temperatures as low as -50°C.


04


s#HEVRON-ARINE,UBRICANTS’ 100BN cylinder oil, Taro Special HT 100, has received approval for use on engines built by Winterthur Gas & Diesel. The decision followed a 4,000-hour shipboard testing programme conducted by Chevron.


sThe partners of the "LUE4%#4IDAL %NERGY PROJECT report that the first operational months of its renewable energy platform have been successful. With every tidal flow, the platform supplies electricity into the Dutch national grid. BlueTEC is now planning the installation of a second, larger turbine.


s#AMMELL,AIRDshipyard has been selected by the UK government as the preferred bidder to build a state-of-the-art £200 million polar research ship. The shipyard is expected to cut steel in autumn 2016 and deliver the research vessel for operation by 2019.


s-ARLINK has completed the roll-out of VSAT connectivity across the entire Kuwait Oil Tanker Company (KOTC) fleet of 26 tankers. Most of the vessels started with CIR 256/128Kbps, with temporary upgrades up to CIR 1Mbps also available on request.


Bigger bills ahead for ship owners


Vessel operating costs are expected to rise by 3.1% in 2016 according to a survey conducted by accountant and shipping consultant Moore Stephens. The group also reported that owners and operators experienced a 2.8% rise in expenditure over the course of this year. Categories most likely to be affected include the perennial cost centres of crew wages, maintenance and drydocking. “It’s no surprise that crew feature near the top of


the predicted operating cost increases for both 2015 and 2016, not least because of the Maritime Labour Convention,” said Moore Stephens shipping partner Richard Greiner. However, he stressed that for shipping, as for every industry, investment in good staff will always be money well spent.


According to feedback canvassed mainly from


Asian and European owners and shipmanagers, the highest cost increase for 2015 were seen in the offshore sector, which averaged 3.4%, compared to other sectors with an increase of 2.8%. For the year ahead, while the average cost


increase is expected to be 3.1%, tanker operators are likely to pay a little bit more, with a projected outlay of 3.4%. Meanwhile, the container ship sector isn’t far behind at 3.3%. One respondent highlighted the fact that shipmanagers are under increasing pressure from unfavourable markets: “Managers are now required to look after much more but for the same management fees.”


“It’s no surprise that crew feature near the top of the operating cost increases, because of the Maritime Labour Convention.”


Maersk cuts 4,000 jobs on market weakness


Lower demand is forcing Maersk Line to cut 4,000 jobs – represent- ing around one-in-six of its workforce – mainly among shore-based staff, in an effort to retain its market position. The company added that it is seeking further cost reductions over the


next two years by ‘digitalising more processes’. “We are on a journey to


transform Maersk Line. We will make the organisation leaner and simpler. We want to improve our customer experience digitally and at the same time work as


efficiently as possible,” said Maersk head Søren Skou. At the same time, the operator


said it would not exercise options for six 19,630 TEU vessels, two 3,600 TEU feeders and postpone a decision on a further eight 14,000 TEU vessels.


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