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SHIPYARD SCOPE Q


G


erman shipyard Meyer Werft has put the town of Papenburg on the map for the cruise market, not as a


destination port, but as the birthplace for many vessels in the world fleet. The family-led group, which opened its first dock in 1795, also operates bases in the German town of Rostock and in Finland. It has manufactured 39 luxury cruise ships to date – two of which were delivered this year. Additionally, it is making inroads into the marine science market, having delivered research ship Sonne in November 2014. The vessel is currently attempting to uncover the secrets of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Although cruise construction


accounts for the majority of the yard’s income, it also offers traditional shipbuilding. In recent years it has constructed more than 30 ROPAX ferries, more than 60 gas and LNG tankers, as well as 24 small passenger ships destined for service in Indonesia. “We are a general contractor,


supplying everything from carpet to tile and always work with local businesses,” head of communica- tions Peter Hackmann tells The Marine Professional. “I find it charming to have such a good relationship with our suppliers.” The yard’s order book is filled


to the seams for the next five years as it is contracted to build three ships for Royal Caribbean International, two for Asian Star Cruises as well as a further two for Aida Cruises. The star of its order book, however, is Norwegian Cruise Line, which recently took delivery of the Norwegian Escape and has four ships yet to be built.


Building a (relation)-ship


The customer relationships are key to the yard’s success in winning repeat business: Norwegian Escape was the tenth occasion that Meyer Werft and the cruise line had worked together.


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