This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
28


MOVING ON


As shipping companies adapt to electronic navigation, it’s now time for colleges and organisations charged with inspecting vessels to begin to follow suit


Words: Kevin Tester


Last month a team of four personnel from the navigation training provider ECDIS Ltd touched down at Sabiha Gökçen International Airport in Turkey armed with screwdrivers, hex keys and an array of other tools. Their destination was a local technical university and the clock was already ticking… “When we arrived on Monday morning,


wires were dangling from the ceiling and workers were still running around fitting the lights and aircon. Over six tonnes of steel, computers and cable were waiting for us. When we departed on Friday evening, we left


behind four fully installedbridge simulators. It was ‘flash to bang’ in five working days,” explains Mark Broster, managing director of the training firm, who still seemed out of breath from the experience. The company has found itself increasingly


involved in projects of this sort, as colleges worldwide strive to make their training more relevant for officers more accustomed to using ECDIS over paper charts. When the IMO- enforced transition to all-electronic navigation was only just starting, ship operators were willing to tolerate syllabi held over from the


days of paper charts. Not every vessel had switched over to the new system and the principles of this traditional training were, broadly speaking, still relevant. But such tolerance may be running out, says Broster. “More fleets exclusively use ECDIS as the


primary means of navigation. So sending crew to learn about paper corrections and sextants isn’t really going to cut it anymore. It’s reminiscent of the transition from sail to steam or to diesel propulsion. Sure, everyone enjoys learning how to use a sextant but, eventually, we’re going to reach point where you have to


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76