This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Q GLOBAL NEWS CURRENTS En route to offshore standardisation


The big three Korean shipbuild- ers Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI), Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) and Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI) have joined forces with classifca- tion society ABS to develop new design standards for offshore oil and gas projects. The joint effort will also involve leading operators, drilling contractors and engineering companies. The aim is to establish new


08 06


global design standardisation procedures across the offshore industry. ABS will lead the process to verify the developed standards, conduct safety and risk assessments and provide a gap-analysis report.


“We believe material, equipment and design standardi- sation among shipbuilders and designers, particularly on complex offshore structures, has significant potential to improve overall construction economics and enhance safety,” explained Dr Hoseong Lee of the ABS Korea Energy Technology Center, who is leading the programme. To get the project underway,


ABS hosted a two-day workshop with the Korean shipbuilders and local industry associations together with Houston-based operators and engineering companies to explore ways of improving design and construc- tion efficiencies.


It’s not the first time that


greater standardisation has been proposed. In the shipping domain, propulsion systems manufacturer Rolls-Royce has made the case for homogenised machinery space, around which different hull forms could be selected and fitted depending on a vessel’s intended


trade or operational profile. However, in some respects, standardised vessel designs are already a reality, especially for simpler ship types, such as bulk carriers, where many shipyards offer owners cookie-cutter templates with little leeway for alteration or adjustment.


Ship owner wins norovirus case


A recent UK court case (Nolan vs TUI UK Ltd) ruled that owners and operators of passen- ger ships aren’t liable for norovirus out- breaks, provided industry standards on preventing illness outbreaks have been followed and that necessary measures are taken to manage and contain the problem. “Claims from passengers alleging that


they have contracted gastric illness while on members’ ships are becoming all too


common,” explained Victoria Brown, who works for ship insurer UK P&I Club. “One defence is to argue that the illnesses


weren’t bacterial but viral in nature, and therefore unrelated to a lack of hygiene or food safety. Evidence that a gastric illness is a norovirus, rather than a food-borne bacterial infection, puts a ship owner on far stronger ground to argue that the illness wasn’t due to any failing on its part,” she added.


AMSA bans vessel from


Australian ports Continuing its campaign to ‘name and shame’ vessels that repeat- edly flout international regula- tions, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) has banned an Indonesian-flagged cargo ship from entering any port in Australia for three months. Noah Satu, owned by PT


Anugerah Samudra Indomakur and operated by subsidiary PT Adnyana, has been detained by AMSA four times since August 2013. The ban will remain in place until mid-December. It’s not the first time AMSA has


taken a tough stance with repeat offenders. At the beginning of this year, it banned the container ship Red Rover, also Indonesian flagged, for an unprecedented one year after the operator failed to heed repeated warnings relating to navigation and safety deficiencies.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76