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LIGHTING DESIGN


Table 1: Profitability calculation. Comparison calculations – Check efficiency and economy


Lighting and environmental characteristics of the system 1


Lamp Model


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


10 11


12 13 14


Lamp nominal luminous flux Reactor model


Reactor technology


Luminous flux factor reactor Luminous flux obtained by lamp Luminaire Model


Obtained light level (illuminance) Environmental area Lamp life


Total quantity of lamps Total number of fixtures


Installed capacity of each lamp (lamps + accessories) Total installed power


Features of use 15 Monthly use time


16 Monthly kWh consumption 17


Equipment costs involved 18 19


Price of each lamp Price of each lamp


20 Price of each accessory per luminaire 21


Project cost + installation 22 Average cost of electricity (kWh price)


Investment costs 23


Installation to equipment costs 24 Difference between the investment costs


Operational costs 25 Cost of energy monthly consumption 26 Average monthly cost of replacement lamps


27 Reduction in the air conditioning system power consumption 28


Sum of operating costs 29 Monthly difference between operating costs


Profitability assessment 30 Return on investment


Comparative installation of consumption data 31


Power density Relative Source: Osram Brazil's Cia Lamps Eletricas.


between the investment cost is minus US$ 15,150.00 and maintenance cost is minus US$ 35.57. The relative power density is 2.4 W/m2


to 100 lux.


Conclusions The study aimed to achieve energy savings, increased electrical energy maintenance intervals, the reduction of air conditioning load and consequently, a noise level reduction. One of the main factors of this research


was to help improve the quality of planning the health facilities. For this we


IFHE DIGEST 2017


mathematically designed a booth for biological material collection to ensure environmental and visual comfort. Rethinking the lighting flux was important because there is a tendancy, due to a lack of investment in lighting design, to utilise artificial light sources which are wrong for the space. We recommend the use of a lighting


sheet – of cost x investment – for new healthcare facilities. The utilisation of new lighting products


was economically feasible. The visual comfort is presented by UGR numbers on


the workbench through supplementary report. The flicker effect was clearly noted. This is caused by fluctuating voltage in a series of regular or irregular variations that results in the visual impression of the changes in the luminous flux of fluorescent lights. Evidence shows that changing the colours and finishes specified could could change this, but the data placed in the software gave a safety margin if there is a replacement of walls, floors and ceilings regarding reflection, refraction and transmission of artificial light source.


Average durability of the lamps in this application


lux m2


hours units units watts kW


hours/month kWh/month months


US$ US$ US$ US$ US$


US$ US$


US$ US$ US$ US$ US$


months (W/m2 for 100 lux) 26.6 lumens


System current


DD18/827 1.366


RSI 2X32-220V Magnetic 0.92 1.257


E4433-218 108 3


8.000 2 2


36 0.07


120 9


67 15.00


120.00 20.00 0.00


0.20 310.00 –130.00 1.73


0.45 n/a 2.18


55.72 –2 10.1 1.81


0.00 55.81


–53.55 180.00


System proposed


LEDS 25W plano 1.769


SKY 2626 Electronic 1.1


1.946


SKY 2626 297 3


25.000 1


3


25,2 0.08


120 9


208 0.00


60.00 0.00 0.00


IFHE 65


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