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BUILDING DESIGN


REGULATORY FRAMEWORK Regulatory Framework


REGULATORY ITEMS


REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 5.19.1


The spaces of the building should be organised according to zones.


Health Technical Memoranda 5.19.2 Health Building Notes


5.19 The idea of creating zones within the building is represented diagrammatically in Figure 4. The optional spaces represent those facilities that are not provided in every building and may or may not fall outside the public, primary and community care, and staff zones.


Figure 1. Regulatory framework and breakdown into requirements.


translating and shaping information from regulatory documents, with poor consideration of qualitative and subject requirements. In fact, not all regulatory information can be understood in terms of definitive solutions offered to designers, and much depends on individual interpretation and judgement. Consideration of the diversity of


requirements existing in the healthcare regulatory framework is fundamental to enable their use in design practice. It is important that requirements are not understood according to a ‘one size fits all’ approach, but from their ‘inside out’ – what are their characteristics that either enable or hinder their use with automation.


Embedded subjectivity is a key element in requirements definition – and it is intrinsically associated to design requirements, due to the subjective and creative nature of this process. Requirements subjectivity is often seen as damaging and disruptive to automated design approaches, leading to potential biases and misunderstandings while


assessing design proposals. The paradox involved in this reasoning is close to thinking that subjectivity can be simply eliminated from the regulatory framework by using automated approaches. This results in limited outcomes in practice because of the incompatibility between automation and human subjectivity. In the UK, this becomes particularly


relevant due to the guidance character of the regulatory framework, which necessitate human decision-making. Hence, there is a need to approach automation as design support rather than a substitute to designer’s decision making. Consequently, a semi-automated (or


hybrid) approach is desirable, in which requirements which can be automatically checked are (e.g. quantitative, dimensional requirements), and those who cannot (e.g. subjective) could be automatically highlighted for consideration by designers. Therefore, understanding information


HBN 00-03 1753


requirements


HBN 11-01 782


Regulatory Framework 108


documents 80,000+ Estimation of requirements


Building Reg M2 443


requirements


HTM 07-07 138


requirements


Figure 2. Estimation of number of building requirements in the healthcare regulatory framework.


IFHE DIGEST 2021 requirements


HBN 00-01 576


requirements


existing in regulatory requirements prior to their use as an input to automated checking is fundamental to achieve good results in practice. The ‘automation as support’ reasoning means that hybrid approaches could be used to better integrate designers’ activities to automated and technological inputs.


One first step in this direction has been made in the project ‘Recommendations for automated checking of regulations and requirements management in healthcare design’, led by the Innovative Design Lab research centre at the University of Huddersfield in the UK and funded through the Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB). This consists of understanding different types of requirements from the UK healthcare regulatory framework and how different degrees of automation could be adopted. In this project, a detailed analysis was


Space object


Zones for primary care building should be: primary and community care zone, public zone, staff zone and optional spaces.


5.19.3


The optional spaces represent those facilities that are not provided in every building and may or may not fall outside the public, primary and community care, and staff zones.


FF&E object


MEP object


Figure 3. Types of objects in which requirements are easily checked.


conducted on five healthcare design regulatory and guidance documents, i.e. (i) HBN 11-01 – Facilities for primary and community care services; (ii) HBN 00-01 – General design guidance for healthcare buildings; (iii) HBN 00-03 – Clinical and clinical support spaces; (iv) HTM 07-07 – Sustainable health and social care buildings; and (v) Building Regulation – Access to and use of buildings – Volume 2: Buildings other than dwellings.


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