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BUILDING DESIGN


JOAO SOLIMAN-JUNIOR, PROFESSOR PATRICIA TZORTZOPOULOS – UNIVERSITY OF HUDDERSFIELD, UK PROFESSOR MIKE KAGIOGLOU - WESTERN SYDNEY UNIVERSITY, AUSTRALIA


Regulation checking during facility design


This article presents a short overview of research outcomes that will be of benefit to practitioners in dealing checking healthcare designs regulatory compliance and how compliance checking could be automated during the design process.


COVID-19 has highlighted the need for a stronger focus on designing new buildings that will be fit for purpose for future healthcare challenges. The way that built infrastructure can shield and accommodate the wellbeing of humans is critical. Healthcare buildings are known for their complexity, and their design is constrained by regulatory documents and guidelines, which have an impact on design decision-making. In fact, within the UK, most of these documents are presented as best practice


guidance and are often used to determine building design compliance. The challenge of how to ensure compliance to what may amount to tens of thousands of requirements is not an insignificant one.


Overview of the UK’s healthcare facilities regulatory framework Delivering better health outcomes is one of the key priorities of the UK government. Improving design quality can enable faster patients recovery1 helps to improve staff performance and


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retention. Better design can also support more efficient healthcare service delivery, which contributes to achieve operational gains and cost savings. Healthcare design guidance documents, i.e. Health Building Notes (HBN) and Health Technical Memoranda (HTM), play an important role in supporting design decision-making. These should be understood as best practice standards, providing “essential information on how to comply with the statutory and policy framework around the assurance of estates and facilities”.2 Despite not being statutory documents, they include important compliance information in healthcare projects. Hence, any deviation or derogation from these documents must include a justification describing how these are as functional and safe as the original requirements from HBNs and HTMs. The UK healthcare design regulatory


Joao Soliman-Junior Patricia Tzortzopoulos Mike Kagioglou


•Joao Soliman-Junior is a research assistant and PhD student at the Innovative Design Lab, School of Art, Design and Architecture at University of Huddersfield in the UK. Since 2012, Joao’s research encompasses the use of technology, automation and building information modelling to support architectural and engineering building design. He has been involved in multiple national and international research projects on social housing and healthcare projects. •Patricia Tzortzopoulos is professor of integrated design, associate dean for research and enterprise and director of the Innovative Design Lab research centre at the School of Art, Design and Architecture at the University of Huddersfield in the UK. She comes from an architectural background and her interests cover design management, lean construction, value generation, building information modelling (BIM), and the design of healthcare facilities. She developed projects examining requirements management, evidence-based design, code checking in healthcare design, participatory design, BIM in the retrofit of social housing, between others. Patricia is associate editor of the Brazilian journal Ambiente Construido and has supervised research students and published extensively. •Professor Mike Kagioglou is the dean of engineering at Western Sydney University in Australia. Mike’s career spans engineering, manufacturing, creativity, design, architecture and the built environment, engaged in inter and multi-disciplinary research at a global level. He was an academic director for the £11m Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) interdisciplinary Innovative Manufacturing Research Centre (IMRC) in Health and Care Infrastructures Research and Innovation Centre (HaCIRIC) and was previously the director of the £8m EPSRC Salford Centre for Research and Innovation (SCRI) in the built and human environment. Mike has published more than 210 academic referred papers, many industrial reports and three books.


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framework includes approximately 108 documents and represents both guidance and statutory information, i.e. 37 HBNs, 52 HTMs and 19 documents related to the various Building Regulations. These documents originate multiple requirements (see Fig 1). Such requirements include quantitative and qualitative information. In practice, that means requirements are presented to designers under quantities, dimensions and other types of measurements when quantitative; or as descriptions, definitions or inclusion and exclusion criteria when qualitative. These requirements can also be objective or subjective, depending on how much they rely on individual and personal judgment to be considered and assessed in building design.


Healthcare regulatory documents and automation When it comes to incorporating a degree of automation in the healthcare building design process, there is a clear incompatibility between the regulatory framework and existing automated approaches. Existing research focuses on


IFHE DIGEST 2021


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