search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FACILITIES MANAGEMENT


assessment, and they will provide broad recommendations at little or no cost. Segment items early on. Divide electrical biomedical equipment and all other non-hospital specific equipment into categories; hospital-owned useable, hospital-owned redundant, non- transferring lease, donated and loan equipment. It is very easy to include loaned and leased electrical biomedical devices with working equipment, only to find that the lease company is asking for their equipment back when you are in the middle of moving locations. Create a framework. After all factors of


the project have been considered a dedicated framework can be created for how the project will be carried out and by whom, and a tender specification drawn up.


Do not waste time and money on inventory compilation. Hospital trusts waste hundreds of thousands of pounds every year on employing consultants to carry out inventories that are of little practical use when clearing old sites. If the assets are of minimal worth then this cataloguing of equipment is rendered null and void.


Get rid of all potential waste.


Ascertain what is green waste, what is potentially hazardous waste, what has to be recycled, waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) as you will be disposing of potentially tons of equipment and furniture, much of which should be recycled. Decontaminate. Are there areas that will need decontamination before contractors can come in? Decontaminants like asbestos and a leaky anaesthetic machine can pose life-threatening hazards to an unsuspecting contractor. Take into consideration ALL assets. All


projects comprise of non-medical items and every item, not just those of a medical nature, has to be taken into account of how it has to be dealt with or disposed of. Sufficient time will need to be allocated to


Buy only essential new equipment.


sell or dispose of any additional assets, such as boilers, plant or radiography equipment and the hospital’s estates department will have to decommission these services.


3. Transferring locations A physical move of any description is complicated, and often reported as the most distressing event in any person’s life. It is often easy to focus on planning how patients and staff will transfer, and clearing the old site and equipment can be overlooked.


Do not leave anything out of the scoping document. If you are clearing an old site and transferring over to a new site, then include the site clearance project in the initial scoping document of the new facility.


Emptying wards takes time. A


clearance cannot commence until wards are empty so factor in contingency for potential delays with the new build that can result in staff not transferring when planned.


Buy only essential new equipment. Not all equipment can be transferred in


the move as patient services need an uninterrupted service. New equipment will have to be purchased and old equipment left behind at the old site. This is especially relevant to fixed equipment such as magnetic resonance imaging machinery. The old equipment left at the old site can then be sold.


Use the old site for storage. Once the


last patient has moved successfully to the new site, you can take stock of what now needs to be done. The essential processes of the move have been done, so use the old site for the warehousing of the residual disused equipment.


4. Contracts


Contingency, contingency, contingency. If the site is being sold, then it is prudent to factor in a lot of contingency when it comes to estimating delivery target dates. Not allowing enough time to vacate a site is a common occurrence and may well incur large penalty charges to the hospital. Do not, in any case, hand over the building to the demolition crew or its new owners the day after the last patient has left. You will have old equipment to sell, and this takes time, as auctions have to be held and buyers have to collect their items.


Be careful of the small print. Contracts


often contain unrealistic expectations of what the hospital trust has to deliver when vacating a site. There have been reports that include the sterilisation of areas that would normally not be considered hazardous and inaccurate definitions of what fixtures and fittings are included when selling on redundant assets, that can lead to time-consuming disputes.


5. Clearing the site Get rid of all potential waste. IFHE DIGEST 2021


Appoint a clearance manager. Someone who has sufficient seniority is essential to either make decisions or ensure that decisions are made quickly, as time is of the essence with clearances. The


91


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116