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DAVID DUNNING – MARKETING EXECUTIVE, HILDITCH GROUP, UK FACILITIES MANAGEMENT


10 toptipsformanaging hospital site clearances


David Dunning of UK medical equipment auctioneers Hilditch outlines ten top tips for the replacement of ageing healthcare facilities, completing a successful site clearance and installing large medical equipment.


The healthcare sector of any country is in a constant state of flux. Even in countries with a public healthcare system machinery and facilities have a finite life span and need to be routinely replaced. The worldwide average of money being spent on healthcare is ten per cent of a country’s gross domestic product (GDP). The United Kingdom conforms to this average, the Republic of Ireland spends eight per cent of its GDP and with Germany tops the bill at 12 per cent of GDP. Maintaining and replenishing a country’s medical estates and facilities is an expensive business, with £6.5 billion (¤7.6 billion) being spent per in the UK alone. There seems to be unlimited ways to spend money on building new facilities and the latest technological developments in biomedical engineering. However, there does seem to be a shortage of advice on methods for sensibly reusing and recycling old medical devices and especially large imaging equipment and site facilities. This is not a highly grossing industry and one can only assume this is not a glamorous one to be in either. Even relatively small site clearances are


expensive, but if you are clearing an entire hospital site the cost could easily be in the millions. However, with appropriate planning these costs can be moderated, and even offset, by the sale of any redundant assets. Yet every site clearance is different, and there is no single tried and tested method to ensure that everything runs smoothly.


Work as a team.


1. Public relations The first step is always the most important, as this dictates the direction of the whole project and likelihood of a successful profitable outcome, as opposed to a project fraught with miscommunication and firefighting. The first step is not necessarily what you might think. Before a plan has been drawn up, the


first piece of equipment has been moved, or contract been put out to tender, public opinion should be taken fully into consideration. Strangely, the general public can be very attached to their crumbling Victorian hospitals, with their draughts and dodgy plumbing. We have all seen countless cases in the media over


David Dunning


David Dunning is a marketing executive with UK medical equipment auctioneers Hilditch Group. David plays a pivotal role in bringing the Hilditch Group to the multitude of markets throughout Europe. David is an enthusiastic, ideas-driven marketer, with over 15 years of marketing communications


experience across retail, fashion, manufacturing, healthcare and non-profit sectors, in the UK and India. This varied career path has resulted in adaptable working methods and adept creative problem solving over the business to business and business to consumer markets.


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the years where members of the public are up in arms, as they do not understand why the hospital needs to move to a new super-efficient site on the outskirts of town. It is highly recommended that a PR plan of action is created to handle public issues. Now is the time for focus groups on which press release to go with!


2. Assessing the project When assessing what is coming out of a site, take the holistic approach and take stock of the number of assets, their size, the logistics and timescales involved compared to their total worth. From this you can highlight the risks, potential liability issues, areas for potential financial returns. It is then possible to work out what the potential outcomes, objectives and key performance indicators the project will have, so that you can work out a rough budget to achieve your objectives.


Use an asset management company. OK, this can be carried out by your team but it is often found to be a very daunting prospect to undertake, as public hospitals generally do not have a dedicated project management team. This part is pivotal to the entire project. Most health organisations use an asset management company to carry out an initial site


IFHE DIGEST 2021


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