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EMERGENCY FACILITIES


SANTIAGO VIALE LESCANO; JUAN MANUEL JUÁREZ; SALVADOR MARIA VIALE – ARCHITECTS, SANTIAGO VIALE ARQUITECTO, ARGENTINA


High-quality modular and transportable ICUs


In response to the need for more hospital beds in Argentina as a result of the outbreak of COVID-19, Córdoba-based healthcare architectural practice Santiago Viale Arquitecto drew up designs for high-quality modular and transportable intensive care units that can be repurposed for future needs at home and abroad.


The idea of developing this modular system of intensive care units (ICU) is in direct response to the overwhelming demand for emergency facilities due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our firm has recently finished the new ICU of the Hospital Privado de Córdoba that has 42 critical beds in 1200 square metres, and we are in permanent contact with all the consultants this type of project requires. Although there is a large number of campaign hospital projects addressing this specific area, our units include superior features, such as individual boxes with positive or negative pressures,


depending on the need and absolute air filtering to avoid contagions. To address the need for modular


systems, we combined our experience in healthcare architecture with an expert in assembling transportable, habitable modules: PyG Servicios, a Córdoba company that designs and builds modular units for the Vaca Muerta oil and gas fields in western Argentina. An important aspect to highlight about these units is - although the impetus for this project is the COVID-19 pandemic - these transportable, modular ICUs are built to last and can remain in their original location as permanent structures,


or they can be relocated depending on future needs in Argentina and other countries. Their flexibility and prefabricated


structure make them a worthwhile, long- term investment in an ever-changing global environment.


Design overview The units include a high-performance ICU, constructed of modular units approved by the Ministry of Health of Argentina. These mobile units can be used to complement traditional hospitals as well as field hospitals. They can be also modified and/or


Santiago Viale Lescano


Juan Manuel Juárez


Salvador Maria Viale


•Santiago Viale Lescano is director of Santiago Viale Arquitecto, a Córdoba-based healthcare architectural practice in Argentina. Specialising in healthcare architecture, Santiago has been working in the area for over 25 years and completed many projects such as Hospital Municipal Príncipe de Asturias, Centro de Rehabilitación de OSSACRA, Terapia Intensiva del Hospital Privado de Córdoba, and Instituto Universitario de Ciencias Biomédicas de Córdoba. He is also a college professor and head of two departments at Universidad Católica de Córdoba. Santiago has been published in many local and international books, magazines, newspapers and websites. •Juan Manuel Juárez is a partner of Santiago Viale Arquitecto having joined the company in 2007. Juan has been part of the architecture department of the Municipality of Córdoba since 1998, being the chief of Public Construction Projects for three years and chief of the Public Construction Inspection Department for six years. His passion for this career has him as a chief of practice exercises of constructive methods I & II at the Universidad Católica de Córdoba since 2008. •Salvador María Viale graduated as an architect in 2000 at the Universidad Católica de Córdoba, later joining Santiago Viale Arquitecto as a partner. In 2008, Salvador decided to make his own path in the construction business, creating the company Rivia SRL. Salvador kept working in architecture projects and now owns his own architecture firm, working on several different projects such as residential, banks and healthcare architecture in Argentina and providing residential projects and architecture visualisation for US firms.


IFHE DIGEST 2021


combined by expanding or retracting their basic layout. The set of modules is designed so it can repeat in all directions. A single line of rooms may also be used in cases where space available for assembly is limited. The basic ICU layout consists of 16 individual standardized boxes, arranged on each side of a central two-way hallway alongside a core of complementary services. Patients, doctors and visits


transference (access) modules are located at the entrance end of the unit, followed by restrooms and hospitalization boxes. The chief doctor, pharmacy and prep rooms are located in the central area, while the healthcare workers’ lounge and sleeping area will occupy the opposite end to the entrance.


Modules The standardized modules will come fully prefabricated. There are four types of modules: l Module 1A – Bed boxes on each side of the hallway.


l Module 1B – Service boxes on each side of the hallway


l Module 2A - Central hallway with removable floor and roof.


l Module 3A – Complementary services core (patient monitoring, equipment deposit, etc.).


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