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EMERGENCY FACILITIES MARIANA IRIGOYEN, LUCIANO MONZA – ARCHITECTS, ARQUISALUD, ARGENTINA


Hospital modules for treatingCOVID-19cases


Mariana Irigoyen and Luciano Monza, partners of the ArquiSalud architecture studio in Buenos Aires, Argentina, outline their project to develop modular hospital units to treat suspected and confirmed COVID-19 patients.


Pedestrian perspective of the three modules set, left, and the intermediate care module, right.


The objective was to develop a proposal that would not leave aside the architectural quality or functional needs to assist patients with emergency care while using a construction system that would allow for a fast construction


Mariana Irigoyen Maria is a partner at ArquiSalud, a Buenos Aires architecture


studio specialised in programme planning, project and building direction of healthcare institutions. Maria is a graduate of the


Faculty of Architecture, Design and Urbanism of Buenos Aires University and a postgraduate teacher at the same faculty. She has also given architecture lectures at conferences in Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Dominican Republic.


Luciano Monza


Luciano is a partner at ArquiSalud, a Buenos Aires architecture studio specialised in programme planning, project and building direction of healthcare institutions. Luciano is a specialist in


healthcare facility planning, and a PhD student at the University of Buenos Aires. Luciano is a former president and vice-


president of the Argentinian Healthcare Architecture and Engineering Association (AADAIH) and was president of the 23rd International Federation of Hospital Engineering (IFHE) World Congress 2014. He is a postgraduate teacher in Argentina, Brazil and Spain, and conference lecturer in


Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, México, Norway, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.


IFHE DIGEST 2021


This project started as a result of a query by a consultant company that wanted to develop a dry construction (steel frame system) solution to quickly expand the installed capacity of Argentina’s health system due to the COVID-19 emergency. Our development focused on a module- based architecture project, similar to a container box, which has dimensions that allow the performance of the functions for the treatment of the suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients. The modules could be installed


complementing and/or expanding any existing health facility, or configuring a new care centre. The modules could be used to develop both emergency/triage examination rooms and the necessary hospitalizations according to the degree of disease development observed in the patient: mild and moderate, severe (intermediate) and critical. Support rooms were designed as a complement to the main modules. The different combinations of the modules make up different building typologies, achieving greater spatial flexibility, architectural versatility and construction speed. The combinations used depend on medical requirements, the geographical location and the existence or not of other constructions located nearby. The objective was to develop a


proposal that would not leave aside the architectural quality or functional needs to assist patients with emergency care while using a construction system that would


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