search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MARTYN BARLOW – ESTATES AND ENGINEERING MANAGER, KING EDWARD MEMORIAL VII HOSPITAL, FALKLAND ISLANDS EMERGENCY PLANNING


Attitudes to COVID-19 crisis in the Falklands


Martyn Barlow, Estates and Engineering manager at the Falkland Islands Government’s King Edward Memorial VII Hospital (KEMH), describes some of the particular challenges for he and his team with the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic.


Located in the Islands’ capital Stanley, the King Edward Memorial VII Hospital is used to dealing with whatever comes through the door, and usually has the ability to evacuate the seriously ill or patients who need specialist care. This all changed when the COVID-19 epidemic started, as international borders closed, and flying to other countries became more difficult. The staff at the KEMH are bracing themselves to receive patients exceeding 300 per cent of what the hospital is designed for, with limited support. There are 14 British Overseas


Territories in various locations around the world, one of which is the Falkland Islands, located in the South Atlantic Ocean, and lying some 8,000 miles from the UK. The KEMH is a small 29-bedded hospital that serves a small civilian population of about 3,000 people, as well as a significant number of military UK Ministry of Defence (MOD) personnel based 35 miles from Stanley at RAF Mount Pleasant. Patients who require specialist care are generally flown to either Chile or the UK, and in the event of some acute cases, emergency evacuation or ‘Aeromed’ will mean that if a Civilian Air Ambulance is not available then the RAF will fly those patients to Uruguay. In such cases KEMH will provide clinical and engineering support to meet patient and equipment needs.


The rear of the King Edward Memorial VII Hospital in Stanley from the air.


Samples must be flown to the UK KEMH does not have the facility to carry out testing for COVID-19 (although this is likely to change in the near future), so samples must be flown to the UK for analysis. With flight disruption, followed by transit time, and the time to process samples, this has at times meant a delay of up to ten days in some cases. This means patients who present symptoms expected of the pandemic victims must be treated as confirmed coronavirus patients until proven otherwise. As the engineering team started to look at the extra resource requirements


Martyn Barlow


Martyn Barlow is the estates and engineering manager at the King Edward Memorial VII Hospital (KEMH) in Stanley on the Falkland Islands. He has been in post as the head of Hospital Engineering for nearly two years, having, as he puts it, ‘been succession planned in’ from his previous role as deputy engineering manager position. In addition to his engineering management role, he also runs all the Health Department Capital Projects. Initially a Royal Navy weapons engineer – a role with a heavy


electrical control engineering bias – he left the Senior Service after 17 years while serving in the Falkland Islands in 2007, working as an


electrical technician in the private sector before being recruited to a facilities management role with the Falkland Islands Government Civil Service.


30


needed to support COVID-19 patients, it became quickly evident that, due to the numbers of expected patients, we should expect to lose team members as they become incapacitated. The impact of such a scenario is potentially even more significant due to the small number of trained engineers at the hospital; key staff loss in such a small team could mean an inability to maintain life- supporting systems such as medical oxygen plant. To mitigate this risk, engineers with previous hospital engineering experience have been drafted in ready to replace critical team members on an emergency call-out basis. Other individuals with high levels of technical competence and engineering aptitude have joined the team and trained on various systems and procedures, the intention being that they will augment the main engineering team for the duration of the COVID-19 threat, thus allowing any reduced engineering capacity due to sickness to be absorbed by these extra members of staff.


Need for extra medical equipment The structure of the KEMH means that procurement of medical equipment is an engineering responsibility, alongside our remit for Capital Projects. However, all


IFHE DIGEST 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116