search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HEALTH ESTATE STRATEGY


which were built in a few weeks. This, combined with the delay of ProCure20 for a year, is likely to create an opportunity for those on existing frameworks and using pre-procured supply chains (e.g. NHS LIFT) to offer up their services and supply chain.


l ICT departments have quickly deployed software to support physical distancing measures and maintain business activities by relaxing firewall restrictions for staff to utilise web-conferencing facilities. It is widely documented in the NHS that its ICT provisions are outdated. The anticipated drive to increase care in the community will likely rely on improved cross- organisation electronic record-sharing. This has the potential to accelerate the ambition to become paperless, and therefore reduce the space required to house paper records.


l The COVID-19 pandemic could see a change from the view that space efficiency must be maximised, and that space which is surplus to immediate operational requirements should be disposed of. The 2016 Carter Report6 identified that ‘A trust’s amount of unoccupied or underused space should be set at a maximum of 2.5%, and despite the target to achieve that by April 2017, 180 NHS sites reported in the 2018-19 ERIC return had more than 2.5% of void space. One of the spaces identified in this return is the Clatterbridge Hospital site owned by Wirral University Teaching Hospitals Foundation Trust, where the first repatriation flights from Wuhan in China brought passengers at the commencement of the pandemic. This space was an essential part of the initial coronavirus response, and the public benefited from it being available to quarantine those who were returning from Wuhan, demonstrating that sometimes retaining ‘fallow’ space might be useful for business continuity purposes.


l The conversion and redevelopment of large regional convention centres into ‘Nightingale’ hospitals across the UK has demonstrated that there is a conflict between the need to ensure that space is utilised efficiently, and to have space ‘in reserve’ for business continuity planning. The speed at which the construction industry developed at scale to deliver the Nightingale facilities has been impressive, and the capacity of the NHS’s critical care provision has not been exceeded; however there does need to be close consideration of the economics of having to develop temporary space at speed versus the retention of space for similar future incidences. This may cause a shift in focusing on business continuity and having additional capacity within the


IFHE DIGEST 2021


A waiting area with spaced seating – with substantially lower capacity than prior to the pandemic.


estate to cope with large-scale epidemics.


l A ‘re-setting’ of the way that NHS commissioners and providers are currently funded, which may mean that those in deficit (which have now been ‘written off’) will be more equally funded in the future. Under the new guidance, 2020/21 capital proceeds from the sale of assets will be available to care systems to invest in line with their estates strategy in the year of disposal and in the following two years, in addition to system-level allocations.7 This should encourage Trusts to consider the disposal of assets that are no longer fit for purpose, or are no longer required given the more streamlined way of working proposed.


l The political focus on the NHS will increase as a result of its very visible frontline position in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the high regard and ‘national treasure’ status that is afforded by the general public. It remains to be seen how Parliamentary attitude will evolve as a result, and the impact on any discussions around NHS privatisation and hospital improvement plans. Furthermore, the current alliance between the Government and the NHS may permanently change the relationship. In 2013 the Lansley reforms saw the NHS take on increased independence from government, but it is conceivable that there may now be a drive to return to more central system management and control.


It remains to be seen what the economic and social impact of the pandemic may be,


but early indications suggest that in the event of an economic downturn, the level of investment recently committed to improving the NHS estate is likely to be retained. The Health Infrastructure Plan that was published prior to the onset of the pandemic, and proposed a co- ordinated and strategic approach to redeveloping the national health estate, recognises that capital is required to directly impact patient recovery. The need for this in the ‘new normal’ has never been more obvious.


References 1 Health and Safety Executive. Regulating occupational health and safety during the coronavirus outbreak, 2020. https://tinyurl.com/yc9kyvwn.


2 Public Health England. Important information for all organisations that rely on a safe water supply to undertake their business activities, 2020. https://tinyurl.com/y8h7rbus.


3 HM Government. Working safely during COVID-19 in offices and contact centres, 2020. https://tinyurl.com/y9cjy6xh.


4 NHS Digital. Estates Returns Information Summary page and dataset for ERIC 2018/19, 2019. https://tinyurl.com/y7n8zje7.


5 Anadaciva S. The deteriorating state of the NHS estate. The King’s Fund, 2019. https://tinyurl.com/y7wbccca.


6 Lord Carter of Coles. Operational productivity and performance in English NHS acute hospitals: Unwarranted variations. Department of Health, 2016. https://tinyurl.com/y23kknvm.


7 Ward S. Debt write-off and capital regime outlined, Healthcare Financial Management Association, 2020. https://tinyurl.com/yadw9k75.


25


IFHE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116