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COVER STORY


Meeting critical needs through modular, engineered solutions


Matthew Mears, national healthcare consultant at Bender UK, explains how the company’s engineering principles have helped it to deliver critical power systems to the health sector during the most testing of times.


Modular construction principles are now used more than ever in the healthcare sector to meet the ever-growing demand for effective and efficient delivery of new facilities. They are used in a variety of ways, from the creation of superstructure and partial fit out of buildings prior to delivery, to complete modular buildings with whole factory-built sections craned into position on site as ‘plug-and-play’ solutions for connection and commissioning. New policy guidance issued to NHS


estates directors states that adopting a ‘manufacturing-led approach’ to the design and construction of new projects will offer great opportunities to improve efficiency and productivity across the estate. It outlines up to 40 per cent increased efficiency for ‘manufactured’ schemes. Every new business case will now need to outline how ‘a manufacturing-led approach’ can be maximised. So, is there still a need for engineered solutions in capital projects with key technical elements assembled to meet a specific need, whether that is in terms of footprint or functionality? Bender UK argues there is, and the


response from customers within the UK medical sector bears out their confidence.


The company is a leader in the provision of critical power systems and theatre equipment solutions for healthcare throughout the UK and Ireland. It can demonstrate expertise in both


working as a valued partner within large-scale modular capital construction projects, and the capability to offer flexible site-specific solutions tailored to meet the needs of NHS and private hospitals through the supply and commissioning of medical IT power systems.


Engineering at the heart of flexible solutions Modular design has become the preferred industrial standard for electrical switchboards with each of the vertical panels comprised of several smaller sub-compartments – modules. Modular design of switchboards allows them to be operated and serviced independently – without affecting the operation of other modules. This is of significant importance for operation and maintenance within hospitals that require resilient critical power 24/7.


Modular design also offers the freedom


to choose the electrical components and switchgear which best meet the specified need, selecting from one supplier or


Matthew Mears


Matthew, national healthcare consultant at Bender UK, is well known and respected within the UK medical sector for providing technical/engineering guidance and solutions, assuring safe and compliant critical power solutions with


resilience and redundancy. In addition to supporting Bender UK partners and its extensive customer base Matthew also informs the regulatory process through membership of the BSi/IET – JPEL 64 Sub-Committee Panel D & IHEEM, Electrical


Technical Platform. Matthew began his career after graduating from Brunel University London with a BEng (Hons) in Manufacturing Engineering from the Systems Engineering Department.


He has worked within the healthcare sector for almost 20 years, supporting, managing and delivering projects.


14


Bender Medical IT Power Systems.


another depending on best fit without compromising quality or performance. Typically, switchboards are erected in a plant room or cupboard which may also house other equipment, and it is therefore important to minimise the space occupied by the switchboards, so the modular design offers the option of engineering the solution to fit the available space. Of course, there is an element of modular design in most modern technical equipment, but maintaining the ability to engineer those solutions - delivering the problem-solving flexibility that is at the very heart of the engineering challenge – is an important asset in any company that prides itself on customer service. The term engineering is derived from the Latin ingenium, meaning cleverness and ingeniare, meaning to contrive or devise. Engineers are defined as professionals who invent, design, analyse, build and test machines or complex systems to fulfil functional objectives and requirements, while considering the limitations imposed by practicality, regulation, safety and cost.


IFHE DIGEST 2021


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