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HEALTH ESTATE ARCHITECTURE


CRISTIANE N. SILVA, VALERIA R. M. NOBRE RICOBOM – ARCHITECTS, BRAZILIAN MINISTRY OF HEALTH’S HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL


Historyandsustainability in estate heritage sites


Cristiane N. Silva and Valeria R. M. Nobre Ricobom of the Brazilian Ministry of Health’s hospital management department in Rio de Janeiro explore the seemingly contradictory question of ensuring listed health estate buildings can be simultaneously modern while retaining their historical and cultural value.


The incorporation of modern technology and specialist units in health estate brings with it the need for buildings to be able to adapt. Contemporary buildings can be adapted more easily to such needs, but less so in older buildings and still less in buildings whose architectural history classifies them as having historical and cultural heritage. The latter type of building requires


great care when modifying the physical environment while maintaining historical characteristics. In addition to the difficulties related to technology upgrades, heritage buildings may also experience problems related to management, conservation and maintenance conditions - especially if they are part of the public healthcare system, which adds political risk. Therefore, it is necessary to study ways that make it possible to establish a coherent link between health estate heritage with sustainability to promote conservation while adapting to health,


Hospital da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Campinas in Sao Paulo state, founded in 1871 and declared a heritage site in 1998.


environmental, social and cultural needs. The concept of heritage and the


preservation of historical and cultural characteristics of buildings started to expand in the 1960s while the 1970s marked the evolution of concepts related


Cristiane N. Silva


Cristiane N. Silva is an architect at the Brazilian Ministry of Health’ hospital management department in Rio de Janeiro, and is head of the infrastructure sector. Cristiane holds a PhD in


Architecture from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and has a ‘specialization’ in health network management from Joaquim Venâncio National School of Public Health. She has extensive experience in healthcare architecture, hospital


infrastructure management, personnel and contract management, preparation of technical documentation for tenders, maintenance, operation and conservation of hospital building systems.


Valeria R. M. Nobre Ricobom Valeria R. M. Nobre Ricobom is an architect, and Master’s


student in historical heritage from Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), a postgraduate in project management from the


Polytechnic School of Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, and a postgraduate in ‘hospitality hospital’ from the Israelite


Institute of Study and Research Albert Einstein. She has worked for 10 years in the architecture and maintenance of healthcare buildings,and for the past six years at the Brazilian Ministry of Health’s hospital management department in Rio de Janeiro.


IFHE DIGEST 2021


to sustainability. The idea of conservation goes beyond the mere maintenance of original state; it also seeks possibilities for the development and usage of buildings without diminishing architectural character. Conservation is mainly focused on


memory, identity and values, while sustainability is essentially focused on issues related to environmental quality and economic growth.1


The 21st century


brings with it a concern to strengthen the meaning of heritage in relation to not only historical and artistic value but also the economic and environmental benefits. Preservation is now concerned with how the social, economic and environmental aspects of cultural assets interrelate with the community and the ‘engines of development’.2


This way of thinking


about the architectural heritage of health estate must also consider “strategies for sustainable management of existing buildings, insofar as they allow adaptations to current needs”.2


Sustainability The environmental damage that is produced or that remains in health estate can last for long periods, contributing as sources of contamination and waste.3 Sustainability, however, is not limited to


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