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WINSOME SEARS REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, WINCHESTER


“I am running because there are adult decisions that need to be made,” says Sears. The Jamaica- born former state delegate and U.S. Marine who later ran a homeless shelter now has a shot at making some of those decisions aſter beating five other candidates for the Republican nomi- nation for lieutenant governor. If successful, Sears, who faces Del. Hala


Ayala in the general election this November, would be the first woman to be Virginia’s lieu- tenant governor and the first woman of color elected to statewide office in Virginia.


LUKE TORIAN CHAIR, HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE, VIRGINIA HOUSE OF DELEGATES, PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY


One of Virginia’s political stalwarts, Torian has been elected six times to represent Prince William County in the House of Delegates, mostly without opposition. This year, he has a challenger, Republican Maria Martin, but Torian had $577,738 in his campaign war chest as of June 30, compared to $9,640 for Martin.


In 2020, when Democrats gained control of the General Assembly,


Torian became the first Black chair of the powerful House Appropriations Committee. The pastor of First Mount Zion Baptist Church in Dumfries, Torian holds degrees from Virginia Union University and Howard University. He has sponsored dozens of successful bills, many in the areas of education, housing and criminal justice. The Virginia Education Association has given him its Solid as a Rock Award five times, and the Virginia Governmental Employees Association named him its 2020 Legislator of the Year. In 2021, Torian introduced what would become


the Virginia Community Policing Act, requiring police to collect demographic information on all drivers they stop, as well as the reason for the stop and whether a warning or citation was issued, data that will be analyzed by the state Department of Criminal Justice Services to investigate racial bias.


GLENN YOUNGKIN REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR, GREAT FALLS


MARK WARNER SENATOR, UNITED STATES SENATE, ALEXANDRIA


Virginia’s 69th governor, Warner is now the state’s senior senator, serving his third term in the U.S. Senate. Known as a moderate who oſten works with colleagues across the aisle, Warner is chairman of the Select Committee on Intelligence and serves on the finance subcommittees governing energy, natural resources and infrastructure, as well as inter- national trade. He is one of just a few Senate Democrats to oppose President Joe Biden’s bid to raise the corporate income tax rate from 21% to 28%. As governor, he promoted the state as busi- ness friendly. He lowered some taxes while increasing sales and cigarette taxes, adding about $1.5 billion annually to state coffers.


Aſter he leſt office, CNBC named Virginia the best state for business in 2007, the first year the cable business news network began ranking the states. Before holding public office, Warner co-founded the company that became Nextel


and invested in hundreds of startups. His net worth reportedly exceeds $200 million. Most recently, Warner has been in the news for the pivotal role he played in gather- ing bipartisan support for Biden’s $1 trillion infrastructure package proposal.


A newcomer to state politics, Youngkin is the wealthiest major party candidate to run for governor and has staked millions of his own money in his campaign, beginning with the six-way battle he won for the gubernatorial nomination this spring. A former co-CEO of The Carlyle Group private equity firm, Youngkin is reportedly worth $300 million. A graduate of Rice University and


Harvard Business School, Youngkin grew up in Richmond and Virginia Beach. He started a career in finance with First Boston and worked for management consulting firm McKinsey & Co. A Republican in an increasingly blue-


voting state, Youngkin is trying to appeal to both Trump devotees (he has received support tweets from the former president) and undecided suburban voters. In a leaked video, Youngkin said he would limit his comments about abortion because it could alienate moderate voters. He has acknowl- edged that Joe Biden is the rightful president but also participated in an “election integrity” rally at Liberty University in August. Youngkin touts his business experience and says he will prioritize job creation and man- ufacturing if he defeats his Democratic oppo- nent, former Gov. Terry McAuliffe, this fall.


Sears served one term in the Virginia House from 2002 to 2004, representing Norfolk, then failed in her 2004 congressional bid. In 2018, she called on GOP voters to choose her as a write-in candidate for U.S. senator in place of nominee Corey Stewart, calling out his past association with white supremacists and his support for the Confederate flag. Sears, whose campaign photo shows her holding a rifle, is endorsed by the National Rifle Association. She owns an appliance and plumb- ing repair business in Winchester.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 97


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