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JEFF RICKETTS PRESIDENT, ANTHEM BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD VIRGINIA, RICHMOND


Ricketts joined Anthem in 1984 and rose through the ranks to lead its Virginia operation in 2017. Anthem has 8,730 employees in the state and offers an array of health plans, including ones through the marketplace exchange for most of the state. A James Madison alum, Ricketts is a Richmond native, “the son of a preacher who worked in the prison system,” he says. “Both of my parents taught me the value of hard work, staying grounded, taking responsibility for your actions and, most importantly, to help those in need.” He’s also co-chair of Gov. Ralph Northam’s primary care task force and serves on several boards, including ChamberRVA, the Virginia Chamber of Commerce, Virginia Center for Health Innovation and Virginia Business Council.


WHAT A COMPETITOR WOULD SAY ABOUT ME: A fierce but fair competitor.


WHAT I’VE LEARNED: People do what you incent them to do — and that does not always mean a monetary incentive, and it’s not necessarily positive incentives. Nothing good happens when incentives aren’t aligned with desired outcomes. This goes for life and in business.


TOM RYAN PRESIDENT AND CEO, LANGLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, NEWPORT NEWS


Langley, the state’s fiſth-largest credit union, continues to grow its assets under Ryan’s leadership. Since he was tapped to lead the Hampton Roads credit union in 2012, assets have dou- bled from $1.7 billion to $3.9 billion, with a $400 million increase during the past year. Membership has also grown from 165,000 to 295,000. Members had about $2.9 billion deposited with Langley and


about $2.6 billion in loans in 2020. Previously an executive vice president and chief operating officer for


Digital Federal Credit Union, Ryan has 35 years of credit union experience. He serves on the Boys & Girls Club of the Virginia Peninsula and Langley for Families Foundation boards. In 2020, the foundation and the credit union together donated $1.4 million, their largest annual amount ever, to Hampton Roads organizations, including the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank; scholarships for students at Hampton, Christopher Newport and Old Dominion universities; and local United Way funds. About $364,000 went to grants as a response to COVID-19.


FREDRICK D.


SCHAUFELD MANAGING DIRECTOR AND CO-FOUNDER, SWAN & LEGEND VENTURE PARTNERS, LEESBURG


The founder of investment firm SWaN & Legend, Schaufeld is a partner in Monumental Sports and Entertainment, which owns the Capitals, Wizards and Mystics teams and Capital One Arena, and he is a part owner of the Washington Nationals Major League Baseball team. Before starting SWaN in 2006, he founded Electronic Warranty Corp,


which was acquired by Asurion in 2008 and is now called NEWAsurion. Schaufeld and his partner, Tony Nader, are credited with pulling Best Buy Corp. out of financial trouble by suggesting in 1996 that it sell comprehen- sive consumer warranties at much lower prices than competitors. Schaufeld sits on numerous companies’ boards, including KIND,


Sugar23, Noodle Partners, Custom Ink and José Andrés’ ThinkFood Group. He and his wife, Karen, are active in organizations that support educa- tion, health, arts and the environment. They have endowed a scholarship fund at their alma mater, Lehigh University, which two of their three chil- dren also attended. In April, the Schaufelds, who own the Hill Top House Hotel property in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, got the green light for a demolition permit, allowing them to build a $139 million hotel expected to open in summer 2024.


JAMES SCHENCK PRESIDENT AND CEO, PENTAGON FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, McLEAN


Since Schenck became president of PenFed in 2017, its assets have grown from $17 billion to $27 billion, and membership has increased from 1.3 million to 2.2 million. During the past year, loan originations rose from $10.1 billion to $16.8 billion. Founded in 1935, PenFed is the second-largest federal credit union based in Virginia. Schenck is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at


West Point and has an MBA from Harvard. In the Army, he flew Black Hawk helicopters in Korea and was a night


vision instructor pilot. Assigned to the Pentagon, he served as a special assistant to the secretary of the Army and on the staff of the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans. He taught economics and finance at West Point and in 2015 Schenck was named one of HillVets Foundation’s 100 most influential veterans and recognized for the contributions PenFed makes to veterans. In 2020, PenFed’s charitable arm gave nearly $3 million to veterans and first responders who were impacted by the pandemic.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 87


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