search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FINANCE/INSURANCE


FRANK L. LUCIA PRESIDENT AND CEO, DELTA DENTAL OF VIRGINIA INC., ROANOKE


A longtime health insurance leader, Lucia has been with Delta Dental’s Virginia branch since 2017. The nonprofit provides dental insurance for more than 2 million members and has 370 employees in the state. Delta Dental’s national foundation provided $1.1 billion in COVID-19 relief funding to help support dental care in underserved communities and also assisted dentists with low- and no-interest loans during the height of the pandemic. The Delta Dental Virginia Foundation contributed more than $4 million to organizations in the state to improve oral health in 2020. Lucia moved to Roanoke from Wisconsin, where he had served as president of Dean Health Plan. A graduate of Binghamton University in New York and the University of Miami, he also is


a CPA. Before joining Dean, Lucia worked with Pricewaterhouse Coopers, WR Grace Inc. and Cigna Corp. During his time


in Virginia, Lucia has devoted time to commu- nity organizations Verge, the Valleys Innovation Council and Virginia Health Catalyst.


FIRST JOB: Masonry apprentice. I carried cinder block. HOBBY: Skiing, being outdoors, woodworking


WHAT I’VE LEARNED: In business and in life, there are certain things that simply can’t be rushed.


DENNIS A. MATHEIS PRESIDENT, SENTARA HEALTH PLANS; EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, SENTARA HEALTHCARE, VIRGINIA BEACH


Matheis heads up Sentara’s health insurance plan, pre- viously known as Optima Health, which covers more than 875,000 members and has 2,600 employees. Sentara is also the majority owner of Virginia Premier,


a Medicaid managed-care organization that the health care system purchased in 2020 from the VCU Health System. A University of Kentucky alum, Matheis is on the executive committee of America’s Health Insurance Plans, the board of directors for the Virginia Association of Health Plans, the Virginia


Chamber of Commerce and the Norfolk Forum. He is also on the board of DarioHealth.


BEST ADVICE FOR OTHERS: Develop your own personal plan. Focus on the next three years of your career, develop mile markers and periodically step back to ask yourself if you are on the right track to achieve your goals.


WHAT MAKES ME PASSIONATE ABOUT MY WORK: A person’s health and well-being are critical to leading a happy and productive life. It is incredibly rewarding to be part of an organization whose primary focus is providing access to high quality health care, through both financing and delivery. I am especially passionate about helping to advance the affordability and quality of health services.


PAUL B. MANNING CHAIRMAN AND CEO, PBM CAPITAL GROUP LLC, CHARLOTTESVILLE


Manning founded PBM Capital, a pri- vate equity firm, aſter selling his infant formula company, PBM Products LLC, for $800 million in 2010 to Perrigo. In recent years, he has become known as a significant philanthropist, donating $1 million in spring 2020 to establish the Manning Fund for COVID-19 Research, money that has gone to eight projects to research vaccines and treatment. In 1997, Manning built his com- pany from a $1 million investment into the world’s leading provider of private-label infant formula and then founded other companies, mostly related to health care. Manning has served on the boards of several startups in which his company has invested. A University of Massachusetts


alum, Manning made a $1 million giſt to his alma mater to support commer- cializing scientific research projects, and he’s served on several committees at U.Va., including its most recent cap- ital campaign. Manning also donated $100,000 to Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin’s campaign, according to finance reports released in July.


In business and in life, there are certain things that simply can’t be rushed.” FRANK L. LUCIA


MARY McDUFFIE PRESIDENT AND CEO, NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, VIENNA


McDuffie has worked at Navy Federal since 1999 and was promoted to CEO in 2018. She is the first woman in this role for Navy Federal, the world’s largest credit union, with 10.6 million members, 346 branches and $148 billion in assets. Navy Federal was named No. 59 in 2021 on the 100 best companies to work for list by Great Place to Work and Fortune magazine, based on employee sur- veys. This is the credit union’s 10th consecutive appearance on the list. A Wellesley College alumna, McDuffie was executive vice president of


delivery channels and communications at Navy Federal, leading the marketing department and launching its mobile banking service. She was promoted to CFO and then quickly to CEO. Much of her focus has been on customer experi- ence; the credit union developed its first mobile app under her leadership. Previously, McDuffie was senior vice president of marketing for Star


Systems Inc. and a senior manager at J. Walter Thompson Inc., a communica- tions company.


84 VIRGINIA 500


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196