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FEDERAL CONTRACTORS/TECHNOLOGY


STEPHEN TRUNDLE PRESIDENT AND CEO, ALARM.COM, TYSONS


Trundle has served as the Tysons-based security company’s leader since 2003. The publicly traded company with a market capitalization of more than $2 billion in December acquired Shooter Detection Systems LLC, which uses acoustic and infrared sensors and algorithms to detect gunshots and communicate incident details to occupants and security. Earlier last year, PointCentral, a subsidiary of Alarm.com, announced it had acquired Doorport Inc., an apart- ment intercom system. Trundle himself made news this spring when he sold 20,000 shares of Alarm.com stock, totaling $1.8 million, and in May during an earnings call for the year’s first quarter, the CEO said its soſtware-as-a- service and licensing revenue was up by 16.8% from the previous year at $107.4 million. Previously, Trundle held several positions at


MicroStrategy Inc., a Tysons-based business soſtware company founded by Michael Saylor in 1989. Trundle was chief technology officer when MicroStrategy launched Alarm.com in 2000 with the goal of creating a security system that would allow clients to monitor their properties via their phones. In 2009, MicroStrategy sold the subsidiary to a consortium of investors led by ABS Capital Partners for $27.7 million.


CLAYTON P. TURNER DIRECTOR, NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER, HAMPTON


In 2019, NASA named Turner the head of the Langley Research Center, making him the center’s first Black director. The agency’s oldest field facility, Langley is known today as the setting for “Hidden Figures,” the 2016 biopic about the Black female mathematicians who were instrumental in the 1960s space race.


In his role, Turner leads civil servants, contractor scientists, researchers, engineers and support staff, who are hard at work on projects that range from expanding the understanding of Earth’s atmosphere to developing new technologies for space exploration. Turner launched his NASA career in 1990 as a design engineer with the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment project. Over his decades at the agency, Turner has worked on numerous other endeavors including the flight test of the Ares 1-X rocket and the entry, descent and landing segment of the Mars Science Laboratory. Turner earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology.


PERSON I ADMIRE: My mother. She navigated through near-impossible situations to enable possibilities and choices. She did all this in an environment that was not always supportive or conducive to her efforts, but she persevered. She had great faith.


JASON S. WALLACE CEO, ADS INC., VIRGINIA BEACH


TOM VECCHIOLLA PRESIDENT AND CEO, ST ENGINEERING NORTH AMERICA INC., ALEXANDRIA


Vecchiolla heads ST Engineering North America Inc., the U.S. subsidiary of Singapore-based ST Engineering, a global technology, defense and engineering group that specializes in the aero- space, electronics, land systems and marine sectors. Previously, Vecchiolla founded a Washington, D.C., consultancy firm to provide senior advisory services for global aerospace and defense clients. He worked for Massachusetts-based aerospace and defense com- pany Raytheon Technologies Corp. for 15 years, with the last three years spent as president of Raytheon International Inc. In that post, he was responsible for the company’s sales and marketing efforts in more than 80 nations worldwide. A career U.S. Naval officer, Vecchiolla served 22 years on active duty as a naval aviator, retiring with the rank of captain. Vecchiolla began work- ing on Capitol Hill in 1996 as a Brookings Institution legislative fellow on the personal staff of U.S. Sen. William S. Cohen of Maine. Later, he served as legislative assistant for National Security and Military Affairs to then- U.S. Sen. Olympia J. Snowe of Maine. ST Engineering has major operations in 16 cities across 12 states and has about 5,000 employees.


74 VIRGINIA 500


In 1997, Luke Hillier created an offshoot of his family’s dive shop business known as Atlantic Diving Supply. Today, it provides military equipment, army procurement, logistics and supply chain solutions for federal agencies and protective services. Wallace joined ADS in 2004. Over the years, he’s served in numer- ous roles, including head of operations and vice president of sales. An alumnus of Old Dominion University, he became CEO in 2014. In recent years, Wallace has had to steer the company through


controversy. In August 2019 the U.S. Department of Justice announced that


Hillier, ADS’ majority owner and former CEO, had agreed to pay $20 million to settle allegations of fraudulently obtaining federal con- tracts reserved for small businesses. ADS settled its part of the dispute for $16 million in 2017. Admission of liability was not a part of either settlement. In 2020, ADS received further scrutiny when it applied for a Paycheck Protection Program loan worth between $2 million and $5 million aſter receiving $1 billion in government contracts in the last quarter of 2019 and $1.3 billion in backlog contract obligations in 2020, according to The Virginian-Pilot. The company was ranked the 22nd largest government contractor in fiscal year 2019.


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