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FEDERAL CONTRACTORS/TECHNOLOGY


TERRY RYAN CEO, CONSTELLIS HOLDINGS LLC, RESTON


Ryan leads a $1.7 billion, 24,000-employee federal contractor that works in 40 countries. He says he got his approach to business from the person he most admires: his mother. “I witnessed her altruistic values having positive and endur- ing impacts on thousands of people,” he says. A graduate of The Ohio State University and National Intelligence University who has spent more than 20 years in federal contracting, Ryan became Constellis’ CEO in January, a promotion from his former post as lead director. He replaced Tim Reardon, who joined Constellis in 2018


and leſt to pursue other interests. Ryan is a former Marine who was an infantry commander and intelligence officer who then served in several executive positions in the Department of Defense, including director of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Before joining Constellis, Ryan was CEO of VT Group and previously was president and chief operating officer of ManTech’s emerging markets group. Ryan also serves on the board of the National Intelligence University Foundation.


BEST ADVICE FOR OTHERS: Focus, focus, focus on what matters and tune out meaningless distractions.


FAVORITE SPORTS TEAM: Cleveland Browns


MEHUL P. SANGHANI CEO, OCTO CONSULTING GROUP, RESTON


Sanghani got an early start on what takes many lead- ers a lifetime to accomplish, starting his company in 2006 at age 30. Also, he and his wife, Hema, both Virginia Tech graduates, are among the university’s youngest major donors with their $10 million giſt, which includes funding the Sanghani Center for Artificial Intelligence and Data Analytics at the Virginia Tech Innovation Campus in Alexandria. Some of the funding also will go to a scholars program for minority students pursuing graduate degrees in AI, one of Sanghani’s focuses, as well as improving food access for VT students. “Higher education is the perfect vehicle for a giſt


like this,” Sanghani said in a statement when the giſt was announced, adding that the university will use innovation “to transform our society for the greater good.” Professionally, Sanghani has had a busy year. Octo Consulting merged with


Fairfax soſtware company Sevatec in December, creating a $300 million company with 1,100 employees. Octo’s clientele includes the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the General Services Administration. In July, Octo acquired Volant Associates, a Chantilly-based defense soſtware development company, for an undisclosed amount.


MIKE SALVINO PRESIDENT AND CEO, DXC TECHNOLOGY, TYSONS


Salvino joined the Fortune 500 end-to-end IT services company in 2019, and he hit the ground running. In 2020, DXC earned $19.6 billion while employing 138,000 people worldwide. The company was founded in 2017 aſter the merger of Computer Science Corp. and the Enterprise Services business of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Corp. In October 2020, DXC finalized the sale of its health business to Veritas Capital for $5 billion, which the company planned to use to reduce its debt by about $3.5 billion. The former man- aging director of Carrick Capital Partners and group chief executive for Accenture Operations is a graduate of Marietta College in Ohio. He serves on its board as well as those of Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering and the Atrium Health Foundation.


SOMETHING I WOULD NEVER DO AGAIN: Worry too much over mistakes. We all will make some. The key is to learn from them, don’t make them again, and have a short memory.


FIRST JOB: Basketball counselor


HOBBY/PASSION: You will find me with my kids or running.


MICHAEL SAYLOR CHAIRMAN AND CEO, MICROSTRATEGY INC., TYSONS


Saylor has been at the center of 2021’s bitcoin mania, spending $2.7 billion on the crypto- currency as its price bounced up and down this spring and summer. Back in 2000, the last time Saylor was this high profile, he was a young tech exec at the top of the dot-com boom and one of the wealthiest people in the Washington, D.C., region. MicroStrategy employs 2,000 people and has 4,000 corporate customers internationally.


Founded in 1989, the company started as a data mining firm providing customer informa- tion to major corporations, including Victoria’s Secret and McDonald’s. A graduate of MIT, Saylor served in the U.S. Air Force and the Air Force Reserve. In 1998, MicroStrategy went public and doubled in value its first day. But by 2000, its stock plummeted from $3,130 to roughly $50 to $200 a share until last fall, when the company announced its plans for acquiring billions of dollars in bitcoin. Saylor’s decision to embrace bitcoin, as well as Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s fluctuating enchantment with cryptocurrency, has returned MicroStrategy and Saylor to renewed prominence. Although Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and other prominent economists have warned about the instability of bitcoin, Saylor still believes in it, tweeting in late July, “#Bitcoin … will last forever.”


72 VIRGINIA 500


Michael Saylor photo by Erika Larsen/Redux


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