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MIKE PETTERS PRESIDENT AND CEO, HUNTINGTON INGALLS INDUSTRIES, NEWPORT NEWS


Petters has led the country’s biggest military ship- building company and the state’s largest industrial employer since 2011, when it was spun off from Northrop Grumman. The U.S. Naval Academy and William & Mary alum joined Newport News Shipbuilding, one of HII’s divisions, in 1987 and worked his way up the corporate ladder, eventually serving as president


of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding when HII was formed. Although the Fortune 500 company, which employs 41,000 people, had to take precau- tionary measures during the height of COVID-19, its shipbuilding branch remained busy. HII is a key subcontractor in the Navy’s $22.2 billion con- tract awarded to General Dynamics in 2019, under which NNS is building 10 nuclear-powered Virginia-class submarines. In July, HII announced it would acquire McLean-based defense contractor Alion Science and Technology Corp. from Veritas Capital in a $1.65 billion all-cash deal expected to close by the end of the year. Petters, who was stationed on the nuclear-powered submarine USS George Bancroſt and spent five years in the U.S. Naval Reserve, also serves on HII’s board.


KEVIN M. PHILLIPS CHAIRMAN, CEO AND PRESIDENT, MANTECH INTERNATIONAL CORP., HERNDON


ManTech was among many companies that found ways to do business during the pandemic. But it also raised $2 million through an employee-matching charitable campaign that benefited frontline work- ers and people in need. Phillips, who joined the management and tech firm in 2002 aſter it acquired his former company, CTX Corp., now leads 9,400 employees at the Fortune 1000 corporation. In addition to earlier contracts with the Navy and the Department of


Homeland Security, ManTech earned a place on a $4.45 billion Department of Defense contract in March to provide security services under the depart- ment’s Special Access Program. The same month, the company hired a chief growth officer to focus on the federal civilian, defense and intelli- gence sectors.


Phillips has won numerous professional honors, including being named


to the Wash100 list from 2017 to 2021. The William & Mary graduate, who also spent 10 years in the Army Reserve, is on the board of trustees of the William & Mary Foundation and chairs its audit committee. He also is the Northern Virginia Technology Council’s vice chair and was named to the council’s Tech 100 list in 2020.


JASON PROVIDAKES PRESIDENT AND CEO, THE MITRE CORP., McLEAN


The head of a not-for-profit organization that manages federally funded research and devel- opment centers, Providakes is an expert in optical and remote sensing and received his Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from Cornell University.


Mitre was founded in 1958 and has 8,400 employees, and although the organization is involved in many areas of study, some of its recent focuses include quantum science and


cybersecurity. Providakes joined Mitre in 1991 as lead scientist and has held several other positions, including senior vice president of Mitre’s Center for Connected Government, now known as Mitre Public Sector. Some of his work has centered on modernizing infrastructure for national security, public health and Army technology. In 2019 he created Mitre Engenuity, a not-for-profit tech foundation focused on forg- ing collaborations to strengthen critical infrastructure for the public good. Providakes has served as a member of the Army Science Board and participated in several studies with the National Academy of Sciences.


JAMES J. RHYU CEO, STRIDE INC., HERNDON


In late 2020, K12 Inc. changed its name to Stride Inc., and named a new CEO in January. Rhyu, who replaced K12’s former CEO, Nathaniel A. Davis, has been with the online learning service for the past eight years. Its name change, Davis noted, was meant to demonstrate that the com- pany is “no longer limited by the boundaries of the K-12 market” and had expanded its reach to lifelong learning. In 2019 the company reported more than $1 billion in revenue. A graduate of the Wharton School at the


University of Pennsylvania and the London Business School, Rhyu worked as chief finance officer and chief administrative officer of Match. com and as senior vice president of finance at Dow Jones & Co. He most recently was Stride’s chief financial officer. In February, Stride selected 47 students to


receive scholarships through its $10 million We Stand Together program, in which underserved Black students receive tuition-free, full-time enrollment to Stride’s online K12 Private Academy. The recipients are from 14 states and are in kindergarten through 11th grade. “A stronger, more inclusive nation begins with economic empowerment, academic equity and career readiness for all,” Rhyu said in a statement.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com


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