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FEDERAL CONTRACTORS/TECHNOLOGY


GEORGE MENDIOLA PRESIDENT, FSA FEDERAL, ASHBURN


Mendiola, a native of Guam, made his way to Virginia for college, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and an MBA from Radford University, then launching a career in federal contracting. Over the years, he served as the federal civilian group vice president for Engility Corp., overseeing a portfolio of projects for the departments of Justice and Defense, as well as 2,500 employees. In 2017 he joined FSA Federal, a joint venture of Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC) and Amentum that was founded in 2004 — although the company was then known as Forfeiture Support Associates. In March 2020 the company secured a potential $1.3 billion contract from the Department of


Justice to provide support services for 14 law enforcement agencies, including the FBI and the Drug Enforcement Administration. The contract has led to a reworking of FSA, which has deployed about 1,400 people across the country to accomplish the work under the potential six-year contract. Mendiola and fellow Radford alumnus Levar Cole — who served together in student government


— established an annual leadership scholarship at the university in 2003 that recognizes undergradu- ates and graduate students with good grades, demonstrated leadership abilities and financial need.


JOHN S. MENGUCCI PRESIDENT AND CEO, CACI INTERNATIONAL INC., ARLINGTON


Although it’s less rare in the federal contracting sec- tor than in other areas of business, it is still notable that Mengucci oversaw a major increase in revenue in fiscal year 2020, as CACI’s earnings increased by $800 million to $5.7 billion. The technology company, which employs about 22,000 people worldwide, received a $1.5 billion contract from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency last year, its largest ever. In July, the company notched a $1.4 billion task order by the U.S. Department of Defense to support the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Decisive Action Task,


which could be extended five years and continues CACI’s 14 years of work with the agency. In 2021 the company hit the Fortune 500 list for the first time since its founding in 1962. A graduate of Clarkson and Syracuse universities, Mengucci was pro- moted to CEO in 2019 aſter serving as CACI’s chief operating officer and pres- ident of U.S. operations. He previously held leadership positions at Lockheed Martin, including as president of information systems. Mengucci’s individual accolades include making the Wash100 list the past two years. He serves on the board of trustees for Clarkson, which is in Potsdam, New York.


BILL MONET INTERIM PRESIDENT AND CEO, NANA REGIONAL CORP.; PRESIDENT AND CEO, AKIMA LLC, HERNDON


Akima has an unusual history compared with other federal contracting companies; it’s an asset owned by the Iñupiat tribes of northwest Alaska. The portfolio of more than 40 companies that employ 8,000 people is under the umbrella of NANA Regional Corp., a for-profit Alaska Native corpora- tion owned by more than 14,500 Indigenous Iñupiat shareholders from a 38,000-square-mile area in northwest Alaska, largely inside the Arctic Circle.


A graduate of Virginia Tech, George Washington


University and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, Monet joined Akima as its chief executive in 2012. In November 2020 he was tapped as the interim president and CEO of Akima’s parent company, replacing Wayne Westlake, who leſt aſter five years.


Despite the changes at the top, Akima moved up in Washington Technology’s Top 100 rank- ings of the largest federal contractors, moving from No. 39 to 28th place in 2021. In fiscal year 2020, Akima had $1.1 billion in federal con- tracts, including a subsidiary’s potential five- year, $40 million deal with the U.S. Air Force to train flight crews. Monet himself, who has 30 years of experience in government contracting, has received Wash100 Awards for the past two years.


70 VIRGINIA 500


PHEBE NOVAKOVIC CHAIRMAN AND CEO, GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP., FALLS CHURCH


Novakovic, who was named Virginia Business’ 2020 Business Person of the Year, managed during the pandemic to maintain a solid bot- tom line at General Dynamics, which employs more than 100,000 people worldwide and has annual revenues of close to $38 billion. Awarded the largest-ever U.S. Navy contract of $22.2 billion to build nine Virginia-class nuclear submarines, as well as other billion- dollar contracts with the Department of Defense and the Navy, the company is in fine fettle in 2021. The daughter of a Serbian immigrant, Novakovic graduated from Smith College with a history degree. She then worked for a small military contractor and joined the CIA, earning her MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Aſter rising quickly up the ranks at the federal Office of Management and Budget and the Pentagon, Novakovic joined the private sector as vice president for strategic planning at General Dynamics in 2001. Since 2013 she has served as chairman and CEO, overseeing the company’s 2018 acquisition of IT conglomerate CSRA Inc. for $9.7 billion, moving General Dynamics into position as a market leader in information technology contracting. Last year, Novakovic was elected to the board of directors for JPMorgan Chase & Co.


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