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FEDERAL CONTRACTORS/TECHNOLOGY REX D.


JENNIFER FELIX PRESIDENT AND CEO, ASRC FEDERAL HOLDING CO., HERNDON


Aſter a long career in finance, including time spent at General Dynamics, Science Applications International Corp. and Vencore Inc., Felix joined ASRC Federal in 2019 as its chief operating officer. Aſter six months, in April 2020, she was named president and CEO of the 7,000-employee company, which provides engineering, IT and infrastructure support to federal agencies. A University of Maryland graduate, Felix won


WashingtonExec’s Chief Officer Award for private company CEO and received her first Wash100 award in April. She also serves on the local Washington, D.C., board of the March of Dimes. In 2021, ASRC won several major federal contracts, including a five-year, $212 mil- lion NASA Research and Education Support Services deal and a potential seven-year, $457 million contract with the U.S. Air Force to provide inventory and supply chain management at an Oklahoma base. In May, the company was awarded a $217 million contract to support cybersecurity operations across the Department of Defense Information Network. Felix also oversaw a rebranding of the company last year, updat- ing its messaging and website to focus on customer missions.


GEVEDEN PRESIDENT AND CEO, BWX TECHNOLOGIES INC., LYNCHBURG


A graduate of Murray State University, Geveden served as chief operating officer at BWXT, a $2.1 billion nuclear


industrial conglomerate, before becoming its president and CEO. Prior to that, he was executive vice president of Teledyne Technologies Inc., president of Teledyne DALSA and associate administrator of NASA, where he spent 17 years.


This year BWXT was awarded $2.2 billion in U.S. Naval


Nuclear Propulsion Program contracts and an extension of a Department of Energy contract worth up to $690 million involving the cleanup of a uranium enrichment plant in Ohio. Analysts expect the company will post full-year sales of $2.19 billion in 2021. With about 7,000 employees, BWXT has 12 major operating sites in the U.S. and Canada. The company also holds contracts with the U.S. Navy, including one that makes it the sole nuclear fuel provider for the branch. Last November, the company was entangled in some contro- versy aſter former U.S. Sen. David Perdue purchased BWXT shares just before he took over the chairmanship of the Senate subcommittee overseeing the Navy fleet. BWXT said that the company was not aware of the stock buy until media reports revealed it.


AMY


JOHN B. GOODMAN CEO, ACCENTURE FEDERAL SERVICES, ARLINGTON


GILLILAND PRESIDENT, GENERAL DYNAMICS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INC., FALLS CHURCH


Gilliland was the third woman in history to lead the entire brigade of midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy. Now she heads a workforce of 30,000 for an $8.5 billion global technology enterprise. Raised by a single mom who was an Army civil servant for 40 years, Gilliland comes from a family with three prior generations of military service that began with her great-grandfather. Gilliland served in the Navy for six years and has been with General Dynamics Corp. since 2005, rising to president of its information technology branch in 2017. She also received degrees from the


University of Cambridge in the U.K. and Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, and she completed the Wharton School’s executive education program in accounting and finance. Gilliland is on the board of the Northern Virginia Technology Council, and in April she joined the board of BNY Mellon. During her time at GDIT, the company doubled in size with its $9.6 billion pur- chase of Falls Church-based IT company CSRA in 2018. In 2020 the company retained the $4.4 billion, 10-year Defense Enterprise Office Solutions (DEOS) con- tract that had previously been awarded to CSRA.


66 VIRGINIA 500


Goodman marked his 23rd year at Accenture with an agreement announced in June to acquire Novetta, the McLean-based advanced analytics company owned by The Carlyle Group. The move will add Novetta’s 1,300 employees to AFS’ 10,500- person workforce. Terms were not disclosed. “By joining forces, we will help clients in all government sectors become leaders in using sophisticated analytics and emerging technologies to solve problems in new ways,” Goodman said in a statement. AFS is a wholly owned subsidiary of Accenture, a Fortune Global 500 company which reported more than $40 billion in revenue in 2020. A graduate of Middlebury College and Harvard, Goodman is a board member of the Atlantic Council and the Northern Virginia Technology Council, and he serves on the Professional Services Council’s executive committee. Goodman has received numerous awards and honors, including four consecutive Wash100 awards since 2018.


WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB? Scooping ice cream at Baskin-Robbins


NEW LIFE EXPERIENCE RECENTLY? Training our new puppy.


PERSON I ADMIRE: My wife, Sherri Goodman, who has broadened our understanding of how climate change affects our national security. [Sherri Goodman, a former U.S. deputy undersecretary of defense, is now a senior fellow at the Wilson Center.]


CHARLES GOTTDIENER PRESIDENT AND CEO, NEUSTAR INC., STERLING


Gottdiener, who took charge of the 2,000-person IT company Neustar in 2018 aſter the formerly public company’s $2.9 billion sale in 2017 to private equity firm Golden Gate Capital, has made significant moves during his time there. Aſter purchasing call authentication and fraud solutions company TrustID and selling its registry business to GoDaddy, in November 2020,


Neustar agreed to acquire Verisign Public DNS, a free domain-name system, from Reston-based Verisign for an undisclosed amount. The service provides security and threat blocking on the internet. Also, earlier this year the company appointed five new executives, all promoted from within. Incorporated in 1998, Neustar was formerly the Communications Industry Services operating unit within Lockheed Martin. Gottdiener, who’s a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and Grinnell College in Iowa, was previously managing director and chief operating officer at Providence Equity Partners and served on the boards of several companies in Providence’s portfolio, including Blackboard Inc. and SRA International. He also worked at Dun & Bradstreet, finishing as president of its global risk, analytics and internet solutions division.


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